Can't access my DVD drive after upgrading to Win10


  1. Posts : 3
    windows 10
       #1

    Can't access my DVD drive after upgrading to Win10


    My DVD drive worked fine in Win7, and still works fine if I boot from it, but since upgrading to Win10 I can't access any disk in it. File Explorer "sees" my G drive, but when I want to look at a disk it tells me to insert a disk. Device manager told me that my drive was a virtual clone drive, so I removed it and deleted the driver, and now I don't see any optical drives. I can't find the model number of the LG drive, so I can't download a suitable driver. Any ideas anyone?
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 440
    Windows 10
       #2

    lemelman said:
    My DVD drive worked fine in Win7, and still works fine if I boot from it, but since upgrading to Win10 I can't access any disk in it. File Explorer "sees" my G drive, but when I want to look at a disk it tells me to insert a disk. Device manager told me that my drive was a virtual clone drive, so I removed it and deleted the driver, and now I don't see any optical drives. I can't find the model number of the LG drive, so I can't download a suitable driver. Any ideas anyone?
    I also had this problem and I got the following in some forum and my problem was solved (It is very common with LG drives)

    Create a registry subkey
    Note To use this method, you must be logged on to Windows as an administrator. If you need help verifying that you are an administrator, go to http://support.microsoft.com/gp/admin

    Important Follow the steps in this section carefully. Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly. Before you modify it, back up the registry for restoration in case problems occur.

    To create the registry subkey, follow these steps:
    1. Press the Windows logo key + R to open the Run box.
    2. Type regedit in the Run box, then press Enter. If you are prompted for an administrator password or for a confirmation, type the password, or click Allow
    3. In the navigation pane, locate the following registry subkey:
    4. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\atapi
    5. Right-click atapi, point to New, then click Key.
    6. Type Controller0, and then press Enter.
    7. Right-click Controller0, point to New, and then click DWORD(32-bit) Value .
    8. Type EnumDevice1, and then press Enter.
    9. Right-click EnumDevice1, click Modify....
    10. Type 1 in the Value data box, and then click OK.
    11. Exit Registry Editor.
    12. Restart the computer.

    Good luck
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 609
    W10
       #3

    Note that the above tip asumes that the drive actually is an ATAPI drive.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 3
    windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #4

    Joergi said:
    Note that the above tip asumes that the drive actually is an ATAPI drive.
    It is an ATAPI drive, but the register change didn't work.
    I then tried the method posted by PSelig a week ago, on the thread called
    "DVD R/W drive has disappeared after upgrading to Windows 10", namely...

    reg.exe add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\atapi\Controller0" /f /v EnumDevice1 /t REG_DWORD /d 0x00000001
    reg.exe add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\atapi\Controller0" /f /v EnumDevice2 /t REG_DWORD /d 0x00000001
    reg.exe add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\atapi\Controller0" /f /v EnumDevice3 /t REG_DWORD /d 0x00000001
    reg.exe add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\atapi\Controller0" /f /v EnumDevice4 /t REG_DWORD /d 0x00000001

    And that eventually worked, BUT it appears that stuff in the registry has an effect on the BIOS routines. When I rebooted I found that I could actually read a CD, so I thought it was fixed. After closing FileManager I found that the system had frozen and the only thing possible was to physically power-off.
    On restarting, the BIOS screens were very slow and eventually just froze. I did a C-A-D restart and noticed that there were several POST messages about ATAPI devices, but it never got as far as starting Windows. After another C-A-D restart I noticed there was one fewer POST message, so I tried again. After a couple more attempts it eventually booted Windows and now appears to be working. FileManager still shows I have a DVD drive, so its encouraging.
    So far, so good.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 440
    Windows 10
       #5

    lemelman said:
    It is an ATAPI drive, but the register change didn't work.
    I then tried the method posted by PSelig a week ago, on the thread called
    "DVD R/W drive has disappeared after upgrading to Windows 10", namely...

    reg.exe add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\atapi\Controller0" /f /v EnumDevice1 /t REG_DWORD /d 0x00000001
    reg.exe add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\atapi\Controller0" /f /v EnumDevice2 /t REG_DWORD /d 0x00000001
    reg.exe add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\atapi\Controller0" /f /v EnumDevice3 /t REG_DWORD /d 0x00000001
    reg.exe add "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\atapi\Controller0" /f /v EnumDevice4 /t REG_DWORD /d 0x00000001

    And that eventually worked, BUT it appears that stuff in the registry has an effect on the BIOS routines. When I rebooted I found that I could actually read a CD, so I thought it was fixed. After closing FileManager I found that the system had frozen and the only thing possible was to physically power-off.
    On restarting, the BIOS screens were very slow and eventually just froze. I did a C-A-D restart and noticed that there were several POST messages about ATAPI devices, but it never got as far as starting Windows. After another C-A-D restart I noticed there was one fewer POST message, so I tried again. After a couple more attempts it eventually booted Windows and now appears to be working. FileManager still shows I have a DVD drive, so its encouraging.
    So far, so good.
    For different PCs, some time different solution work. The solution mentioned by me has worked well on many PCs. May be you missed something or as I earlier said, some time the one solution work for one and not for other. People here share their experience, knowledge and I am happy you suggested one more solution which worked for you. Good luck.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 609
    W10
       #6

    lemelman said:
    And that eventually worked, BUT it appears that stuff in the registry has an effect on the BIOS routines. When I rebooted I found that I could actually read a CD, so I thought it was fixed. After closing FileManager I found that the system had frozen and the only thing possible was to physically power-off.
    On restarting, the BIOS screens were very slow and eventually just froze. I did a C-A-D restart and noticed that there were several POST messages about ATAPI devices, but it never got as far as starting Windows. After another C-A-D restart I noticed there was one fewer POST message, so I tried again. (...)
    Sounds scary...
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 3
    windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #7

    sam9 said:
    For different PCs, some time different solution work. The solution mentioned by me has worked well on many PCs. May be you missed something or as I earlier said, some time the one solution work for one and not for other. People here share their experience, knowledge and I am happy you suggested one more solution which worked for you. Good luck.
    I've just double checked my registry and you're right - I made a mistake. I entered Controller(0) instead of Controller0. If I'd been more careful it would have saved me a lot of grief.
    It would appear that HKLM is an accepted shorthand for HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, at least it is when using reg.exe
      My Computer


 

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