Windows 10: Running on 1 core out of 4

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  1.    06 Oct 2014 #11

    Layback Bear said: View Post
    Attachment 5888

    When you go to msconfig/boot/advanced their should not be any check marks in the two boxes at the top.

    I run an AMD 8150 with 8 cores running 4.5 ghz. I should set it to 1 core? I thought Win 10 would use all my cores, at least better than Win 7 did!
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  2.    06 Oct 2014 #12

    Astrogoth said: View Post
    I run an AMD 8150 with 8 cores running 4.5 ghz. I should set it to 1 core? I thought Win 10 would use all my cores, at least better than Win 7 did!
    Why would you waste 7 cores ??????
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  3.    06 Oct 2014 #13

    i believe 1 is the default setting, seen it before on my other dual core comps.
    some sites advocate enableling all cores, as a way of reducing boot times.

    Roy
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  4.    06 Oct 2014 #14

    CountMike said: View Post
    Why would you waste 7 cores ??????
    That depends on how the OS sees the CPU. It could see it as one CPU = 1 processor so saying "1" would be right. But. It could see each core as a separate processor. They aren't but AMD Inc. likes us to think they are. In that case "8" would be correct. Worse my AMD uses 4 cores divided in half so "4" would be right also!

    Just thought I'd ask.
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  5.    06 Oct 2014 #15

    Astrogoth said: View Post
    That depends on how the OS sees the CPU. It could see it as one CPU = 1 processor so saying "1" would be right. But. It could see each core as a separate processor. They aren't but AMD Inc. likes us to think they are. In that case "8" would be correct. Worse my AMD uses 4 cores divided in half so "4" would be right also!

    Just thought I'd ask.
    No, 4 would be wrong. I physical core is same as separate processor. Each core can have 2 threads which work same ways as single core can do multitasking, one thread crunches data while the other one collects next set of data to process. Some of that data gets written to cache memory before it gets processed so it's size together with prediction success speeds stuff up.
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  6.    06 Oct 2014 #16

    The advanced boot options in msconfig have been a source of confusion since multiple core CPUs became popular. By default the "Number of processors" option is always set to "1" no matter how many cores the computer may have. Many well meaning but poorly informed "tweaking sites" claimed that if you did not manually set this to the actual number of cores then Windows would not use all of them. This is false. Windows is well aware of how many CPUs and cores are available and by default will all of them. Unless the checkbox is set the number of cores shown is of no consequence. I suppose Microsoft should have set this number to the total available. It would have made no difference to system operation but it would have caused less confusion.

    I understand that there are some unusual situations where the number of cores must be explicitly set. But this is by no means the normal.

    The option is provided as a means of limiting the number of CPU cores that will be used, primarily for testing and diagnostic purposes. For example, a developer may wish to test an application to see how it operates with fewer cores than are actually available.

    The number of physical processors is of importance in licensing. In Windows 8 only the Pro and Enterprise editions support more than 1 physical processor and only server editions support more than 2. I haven't found similar information for Windows 10 but it will likely be the same. The number of cores per processor or the total is of no consequence for licensing purposes.

    Another source of confusion is that the options are labeled as "Boot" options. It is sometimes said that these options are only in effect during the boot process. A reasonable assumption but wrong. All of these options remain in effect while Windows is running. The number of cores used during the boot process is usually of little consequence. Only during the latter stages of the process can multiple cores be used and disk performance is usually more important.
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  7.    06 Oct 2014 #17

    Problem is only if checkbox is checked with one core or less than maximum cores/threads processor has. If uchecked or checked with max number of cores/threads, it's same result. Same effect is throughout including BOOT time. Number of active cores/threads can be seen in number of places and programs that take reading from cores directly from windows and does not only estimate that number from processors ID.
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  8.    06 Oct 2014 #18

    CountMike said: View Post
    Problem is only if checkbox is checked with one core or less than maximum cores/threads processor has. If uchecked or checked with max number of cores/threads, it's same result. Same effect is throughout including BOOT time. Number of active cores/threads can be seen in number of places and programs that take reading from cores directly from windows and does not only estimate that number from processors ID.
    Right..I was about to say the same thing, that it doesn't matter what it says in the box, it matters if the box is checked or clear...

    So, I guess you have never run a program designed to limit the number of logical processors to facilitate backwards compatibility with a program (a few older programs choke in the presence of more than a single logical cpu)? Oh, well, that was the only thing I could think of that might have happened, somehow. But glad you've got it sorted--yes, I also like to set things up "my way," too... I know exactly what you mean.
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  9.    06 Oct 2014 #19

    waltc said: View Post
    Right..I was about to say the same thing, that it doesn't matter what it says in the box, it matters if the box is checked or clear...

    So, I guess you have never run a program designed to limit the number of logical processors to facilitate backwards compatibility with a program (a few older programs choke in the presence of more than a single logical cpu)? Oh, well, that was the only thing I could think of that might have happened, somehow. But glad you've got it sorted--yes, I also like to set things up "my way," too... I know exactly what you mean.
    If /when I need to limit number of cores or turn some cores off because of suspected malfunction, I do it thru BIOS, then I can target exact cores to shut off, which method thru msconfig can't. In case of unlocking cores from lets say an AMD Phenom x2 555BE to x4, it's possible that one core is no good and shutting off can let processor run as x3 but can be OCed pretty good. Limiting of number of cores thru windows in that case would have only 1 in 4 chances to shut proper one.
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  10. Posts : 493
    Windows 7/64 Professional
       06 Oct 2014 #20

    I don't care what cpu you use. Just don't have check marks in the boxes and Windows will use all cores as needed.
    What you are doing when you put a check mark is limiting the use of the cpu cores.

    Device Manager will show how many cores there are but it doesn't show how many cores are being used.

    Just leave the boxes without check marks and things will work as they should.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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