Looking for "FAST" transfer speed Drives

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  1. Posts : 271
    Win 10 64 bit
       #1

    Looking for "FAST" transfer speed Drives


    I have this...
    ASUS VivoBook R564JA-UH51T 15.6" Laptop Computer - Gray; Intel Core i5 10th Gen 1035G1 1.0GHz Processor; 8GB DDR4 - Micro Center

    I'm trying to clean-up the harddrive and move files to and external drive. Having problems with video files.
    With this...
    Usb 3.0 2/1TB Flash Drive High-Speed Data Memory Storage Flash Disk Stick LSA UB | eBay

    I'm getting around 5MB/sec transfer. Half the video files are corrupt and will not play.

    with this...
    2TB Portable External Hard Drive USB 3.1 Type C (3 sets, random color) | eBay

    I'm getting around 3-7 Mb/sec transfer. Better, but about 10% of video files are corrupted and will not play.

    Last one I have...
    ELUTENG SSD External Hard Drive Enclosure 2.5 inch SATA to USB3.0 UASP | eBay

    Works fantastic! 75 Mb/sec transfer. Using and old Toshiba 1 Tb. 5400rpm laptop drive.

    Another Eluteng with a 500Gb. HDD will run around $40. Does anyone know of anything that will give me at least 20 Mb/sec transfer speed?

    All transfer's from the USB 3.2 port.

    Running Win 10 Ver.22H2, Build 19045.2673
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 1,249
    Windows 8.1, Win10Pro
       #2

    I know this is off-topic -- but I wanted to share it, anway.

    I learned (the HARD way) not to trust the integrity of external HDDs connected via USB ports.

    I support a bunch of PC and do weekly Macrium Reflect (MR) backups on all of them. Those basckups are usually around 30GB in size, so they fill up local SSDs quickly. When I ran the MR backups, I always used the option to verify the integrity of the new image backup.

    So then, I copied each of the new backups to the external 2TB HDD and copied those to a file server that has LOTS of storage space. This way, I had the latest weekly backup image locally on each PC and two months of them archived on a file server.

    One day, I needed to do a restore -- but I needed a version older than a week, so I copied the backup from the file server to the 2TB external HDD and then to the local PC. When I ran MR, the backup failed the integrity check.

    So, I went to the file server and ran the check there -- it failed there, too. I went through ALL the backups on the file server (the ones that were copied there from the external HDD) and ALL of them failed the integrity checks. I had to use a very old backup to do the restore and then LOTS of updates.

    I tried different USB ports and different USB cables, and the results were always the same -- no errors reported while copying the files but all of them later failed integrity tests.

    I also tried an older 1TB external HDD, of a totally different brand -- and it had the same problems.

    Then later, I saw an external SSD on sale at Costco and bought it. It has a 1TB NVMe drive internal to the case. I made copies of several backups from the PCs using that, copied those to the file server -- and every one of them passed the image integrity checks.

    So, my own advice, if you can afford it, go for an external SSD, not HDD. The performance will be much better and you probably won't run into data intefrity issues.
      My Computer

  3.   My Computer


  4. Posts : 15,378
    Windows10
       #4

    Mark Phelps said:
    I know this is off-topic -- but I wanted to share it, anway.

    I learned (the HARD way) not to trust the integrity of external HDDs connected via USB ports.

    I support a bunch of PC and do weekly Macrium Reflect (MR) backups on all of them. Those basckups are usually around 30GB in size, so they fill up local SSDs quickly. When I ran the MR backups, I always used the option to verify the integrity of the new image backup.

    So then, I copied each of the new backups to the external 2TB HDD and copied those to a file server that has LOTS of storage space. This way, I had the latest weekly backup image locally on each PC and two months of them archived on a file server.

    One day, I needed to do a restore -- but I needed a version older than a week, so I copied the backup from the file server to the 2TB external HDD and then to the local PC. When I ran MR, the backup failed the integrity check.

    So, I went to the file server and ran the check there -- it failed there, too. I went through ALL the backups on the file server (the ones that were copied there from the external HDD) and ALL of them failed the integrity checks. I had to use a very old backup to do the restore and then LOTS of updates.

    I tried different USB ports and different USB cables, and the results were always the same -- no errors reported while copying the files but all of them later failed integrity tests.

    I also tried an older 1TB external HDD, of a totally different brand -- and it had the same problems.

    Then later, I saw an external SSD on sale at Costco and bought it. It has a 1TB NVMe drive internal to the case. I made copies of several backups from the PCs using that, copied those to the file server -- and every one of them passed the image integrity checks.

    So, my own advice, if you can afford it, go for an external SSD, not HDD. The performance will be much better and you probably won't run into data intefrity issues.
    Totally agree - never had any data integrity issues with SSDs.

    I have an older SSD in a usb enclosure and that copies at around 300 MB/s until the I/O buffer cache gets filled (data is filling cache faster than it can write), and speed drops to 100 MB/S. I have never truly understood why the rate drops so low.

    I have an nvme drive in a usb enclosure and that blitzes along, copying at 600 MB/s.

    Robocopy using multiple threads (does not use a buffer cache) can dramatically increase copying rates as well.

    Bear in mind copy performance is strongly impacted by number of files being transferred. I usually image backup the file I want to transfer so it is only copying one file rather than thousands.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 1,249
    Windows 8.1, Win10Pro
       #5

    In don't know.

    I picked up a 1TB SanDisk External SSD from CostCo when they were on sale. Cost around $100 a the time.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 1,249
    Windows 8.1, Win10Pro
       #6

    cereberus said:
    Totally agree - never had any data integrity issues with SSDs.

    I have an older SSD in a usb enclosure and that copies at around 300 MB/s until the I/O buffer cache gets filled (data is filling cache faster than it can write), and speed drops to 100 MB/S. I have never truly understood why the rate drops so low.

    I have an nvme drive in a usb enclosure and that blitzes along, copying at 600 MB/s.

    Robocopy using multiple threads (does not use a buffer cache) can dramatically increase copying rates as well.

    Bear in mind copy performance is strongly impacted by number of files being transferred. I usually image backup the file I want to transfer so it is only copying one file rather than thousands.
    I ran into the same transfer slowdown copying 30GB image files from my internal NVMe SSD to the external SSD. But then, I read (maybe here) about FastCopy and that does not suffer the same slowdown issue.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 2,297
    Windows 10 Pro/Windows 7 Ultimate
       #7

    This + this. You want a NVMe drive with a high TBW (Terabytes Written). May have to go to the manufacture's website to read the specs...


    What Does “TBW” Mean for SSDs?
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 6,196
    Windows 11 Pro - Windows 7 HP - Lubuntu
       #8

    On an external USB drive you have two devices that limit the write and read speed
    - The USB communication limit
    - The drive read / Write speed limit
    Most USB drives are announced as USB 3.x, but has a very slow SSD or HDD.
    If you want a fast USB drive, buy a SATA to USB 3.0 (5 Gbit/s or 600 MB/s after encoding overhead) enclosure and install on it a 2.5" SSD. You will have speeds up to 550MB/s
    If you want a even faster USB drive, buy a NVMe to USB 3.2 (10 Gbit/s or 1200 MB/s after encoding overhead) enclosure and install on it a NVMe SSD. You will have speeds up to 1200MB/s
    Last edited by Megahertz; 16 Mar 2023 at 13:39.
      My Computers


  9. Posts : 271
    Win 10 64 bit
    Thread Starter
       #9

    Thanks for the info. Got it.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 271
    Win 10 64 bit
    Thread Starter
       #10

    Got an SSD and hard drive enclosure. Comparing my Dell HHD, I got around 90 Mb/sec transfer speed. With the SSD, I'm getting 265 Mb/sec transfer speed. The SSD is great, once I figured out how to format it. (You don't want to know)
      My Computer


 

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