Does tiny 2.5 HDDs have such a short life?


  1. Posts : 65
    Windows 10 + VM-WXP / VM-W7
       #1

    Does tiny 2.5 HDDs have such a short life?


    Around 3 years ago I bought a tiny notebook 500GB Seagate HDD tagged as "Video 2.5 HDD". I have no idea what the "video" thing supposed to mean. Anyway, at the time I plugged it into my desktop to function as a secondary drive (my primary one is a Crucial 240Gb SSD) and also I had a very old full-sized and noisy 320GB Samsung HDD functioning as a third drive.

    Last week the tiny Samsung HDD died and so I bought a new 1 TB WD purple full-sized HDD to replace it. Curiously, my very old 320GB Samsung - that now is completing 14 years of reliable work - is still up and spinning and don't show the least sign of fatigue, no bad blocks, no nothing. It's just there fighting bravely.

    My question is: I was unlucky to have the tiny disk dying so prematurely or it's really expected that those small guys long too much less than the full sized disks?

    Thanks!
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 579
    Windows10 Home 64 bit v. 22H2 bld. 19045.2604
       #2

    Interesting that Toshiba publishes MTTF numbers for their 3.5" drives (600,000 hrs.), but not their 2.5" drives.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 23,207
    Win 10 Home ♦♦♦19045.4291 (x64) [22H2]
       #3

    YanKleber said:
    Around 3 years ago I bought a tiny notebook 500GB Seagate HDD tagged as "Video 2.5 HDD". I have no idea what the "video" thing supposed to mean. Anyway, at the time I plugged it into my desktop to function as a secondary drive (my primary one is a Crucial 240Gb SSD) and also I had a very old full-sized and noisy 320GB Samsung HDD functioning as a third drive.

    Last week the tiny Samsung HDD died and so I bought a new 1 TB WD purple full-sized HDD to replace it. Curiously, my very old 320GB Samsung - that now is completing 14 years of reliable work - is still up and spinning and don't show the least sign of fatigue, no bad blocks, no nothing. It's just there fighting bravely.

    My question is: I was unlucky to have the tiny disk dying so prematurely or it's really expected that those small guys long too much less than the full sized disks?

    Thanks!


    Well, I just looked up WD Black 2.5" and 3.5" hard drives, and they both have 5 year warranties.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 9,788
    Mac OS Catalina
       #4

    Yes platter drives tend to die in laptops because of the kindnof use and abuse they are put through.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 65
    Windows 10 + VM-WXP / VM-W7
    Thread Starter
       #5

    Well my point is if tiny disks are susceptible to a shorter life only because they are smaller.

    Think well I guess that it does otherwise why the factories still would make big sized disks?
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  6. Posts : 1,771
    Windows 10 Pro
       #6

    bro67 said:
    Yes platter drives tend to die in laptops because of the kindnof use and abuse they are put through.
    I used to travel a lot, airplanes, hotels, meetings, you name it. I have had two platter drives die on me. I was able to get warranty replacements from HGST. But that was then. Now my laptop has an NVMe SSD and the next oldest laptop has a regular SSD.

    Quieter, more reliable, better performance, and better battery life. It is only a matter of time (1-2-3 years) before 4 and 8 TB NVMe drives become affordable.
      My Computers


  7. Posts : 1,760
    Windows 10 Pro (+ Windows 10 Home VMs for testing)
       #7

    YanKleber said:
    Well my point is if tiny disks are susceptible to a shorter life only because they are smaller.

    Think well I guess that it does otherwise why the factories still would make big sized disks?
    Larger/more platters = much higher capacity, hence why 3.5" HDDs are still popular.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 2,732
    Windows 10
       #8

    "Around 3 years ago I bought a tiny notebook 500GB Seagate HDD tagged as "Video 2.5 HDD". I have no idea what the "video" thing supposed to mean."

    It means that the Firmware has been modified to optimise Video streaming on and off the disk. Usually with less error checking than a standard drive meant for PC/Laptops.

    https://www.seagate.com/www-content/...eo-2.5-hdd.pdf

    "My question is: I was unlucky to have the tiny disk dying so prematurely".

    Yes, it is just chance that it died, assuming no bad treatment during it's life. Your sample size is so small you cannot deduce anything about the reliability v size of the drive.
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 579
    Windows10 Home 64 bit v. 22H2 bld. 19045.2604
       #9

    Perhaps it's because the smaller drives are being used in more portable devices and are more subject to environments that "impact" them? I have two Toshiba 1 TB USB portable 2.5" drives about a year old. I only use them for system image backups and they are treated gently.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 6,301
    Windows 11 Pro - Windows 7 HP - Lubuntu
       #10

    A laptop has a small HDD (2.5") for two reasons:
    - It's a laptop, doesn't have much space on it.
    - A rotating disk has a gyroscopic effect, so they are smaller in diameter and spin slower (5.400 rpm) then a desktop HDD that spins at 7.000 or 10.000 rpm and have a bigger disk as a desktop HDD doesn't move around.

    @YanKleber, a HDD is a mechanic and delicate device. All them will die one day. Yours just did.
    Last edited by Megahertz; 10 Mar 2023 at 15:08.
      My Computers


 

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