Laptop SSD Failed Start Up - "Cannot be Repaired"

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  1. TJR
    Posts : 10
    10/7 Pro 64
    Thread Starter
       #11

    Here are the results from Bootrec scanos and rebuildbcd:

    Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.18362.356]
    (c) 2019 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

    X:\Sources>bootrec /scanos
    Scanning all disks for Windows installations.

    Please wait, since this may take a while...

    Successfully scanned Windows installations.
    Total identified Windows installations: 1
    [1] D:\Windows
    The operation completed successfully.

    X:\Sources>bootrec /rebuildbcd
    Scanning all disks for Windows installations.

    Please wait, since this may take a while...

    Successfully scanned Windows installations.
    Total identified Windows installations: 1
    [1] D:\Windows
    Add installation to boot list? Yes(Y)/No(N)/All(A):y
    The operation completed successfully.
    ________________________________________________________

    It is only finding one OS to add to boot list??

    After a restart, I'm getting the same error as my last post when choosing W10. W7 still boots OK.
      My Computers


  2. Posts : 4,554
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit
       #12

    Please boot your computer with Windows Setup Media and from Windows Recovery Environment start the Command Prompt.

    Please type below command into Command Prompt and press Enter key.

    The following command scans integrity of all protected Windows system files and repairs files with problems when possible.

    Code:
    Sfc  /Scannow   /OFFBOOTDIR=D:\   /OFFWINDIR=D:\Windows


    Please replace partition letter D: with Windows installed partition letter. When computer boots into Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) environment the drive letter assign to Windows partition may not be C: drive letter because Windows 7, 8 , 8.1 and 10 creates a separate system partition when it's installed from scratch. The system partition contains boot files WinRE assigns the system partition the C: drive letter and the Windows installed partition will be assign any other drive letter usually D: drive letter is assign to Windows installed partition. The Bcdedit | find "osdevice" command can be use to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.



    Since the BCD store exists and lists a Windows installation, you'll first have to "remove" it manually and then try to rebuild it again.

    At the Command Prompt, type below command as shown and then press Enter:

    Code:
    C:
    At the Command Prompt, type below command as shown and then press Enter:

    Code:
    bcdedit /export C:\bcdbackup
    The bcdedit command is used here to export the BCD store as a file: bcdbackup. There's no need to specify a file extension.

    The command should return the following on screen:
    The operation completed successfully.

    Meaning the BCD export worked as expected.


    At this point, you need to adjust several file attributes for the BCD store so you can manipulate it. At the prompt, execute the attrib commands exactly like this:

    Code:
    attrib c:\boot\bcd -h -r -s
    What you just did with the attrib command was remove the hidden, read-only, and system attributes from the file bcd. Those attributes restricted the actions you could take on the file. Now that they're gone, you can manipulate the file more freely - specifically, rename it.

    To rename the BCD store, execute the ren command as shown:

    Code:
    ren C:\boot\bcd   bcd.old
    Now that the BCD store is renamed, you should now be able to successfully rebuild it.

    Try rebuilding the BCD again by executing the following, followed by Enter:

    Code:
    bootrec /scanos
    bootrec /rebuildbcd
    Restart your computer after rebuilding the BCD store.
      My Computer


  3. TJR
    Posts : 10
    10/7 Pro 64
    Thread Starter
       #13

    I followed all of the steps, but wondered about pointing to the C: drive as this is the Recovery partition on the HDD. Here are the cmd results:

    Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.18362.356]
    (c) 2019 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

    X:\Sources>diskpart

    Microsoft DiskPart version 10.0.18362.1

    Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation.
    On computer: MININT-19MB5VG

    DISKPART> list vol

    Volume ### Ltr Label Fs Type Size Status Info
    ---------- --- ----------- ----- ---------- ------- --------- --------
    Volume 0 G OS 7 NTFS Partition 99 GB Healthy
    Volume 1 F User Profil NTFS Partition 822 GB Healthy
    Volume 2 H System Rese NTFS Partition 500 MB Healthy
    Volume 3 D OS 10 NTFS Partition 213 GB Healthy
    Volume 4 I NTFS Partition 533 MB Healthy
    Volume 5 E Cruzer_Win1 NTFS Removable 14 GB Healthy
    Volume 6 FAT Partition 101 MB Healthy Hidden
    Volume 7 C RECOVERY NTFS Partition 8 GB Healthy Hidden

    DISKPART> exit

    Leaving DiskPart...

    X:\Sources>sfc /scannow /offbootdir=d:\ /offwindir=d:\windows

    Beginning system scan. This process will take some time.


    Windows Resource Protection could not perform the requested operation.

    X:\Sources>c:

    C:\>bcdedit

    Windows Boot Manager
    --------------------
    identifier {bootmgr}
    device partition=C:
    path \bootmgr
    description Windows Boot Manager
    locale en-us
    inherit {globalsettings}
    default {default}
    resumeobject {308f9756-afff-11eb-ac93-d642c2e5713b}
    displayorder {default}
    {392f8e44-b026-11eb-974a-c1e567d4894a}
    toolsdisplayorder {memdiag}
    timeout 30

    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier {default}
    device partition=G:
    path \Windows\system32\winload.exe
    description Windows 7
    locale en-us
    inherit {bootloadersettings}
    osdevice partition=G:
    systemroot \Windows
    resumeobject {308f9756-afff-11eb-ac93-d642c2e5713b}
    nx OptIn
    detecthal Yes

    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier {392f8e44-b026-11eb-974a-c1e567d4894a}
    device partition=D:
    path \Windows\system32\winload.exe
    description Windows 10 Pro
    locale en-US
    osdevice partition=D:
    systemroot \Windows
    bootmenupolicy Standard

    C:\>bcdedit /export C:\bcdbackup
    The operation completed successfully.

    C:\>attrib c:\boot\bcd -h -r -s

    C:\>ren c:\boot/bcd bcd.old
    The syntax of the command is incorrect.

    C:\>ren c:\boot\bcd bcd.old

    C:\>bootrec /scanos
    Scanning all disks for Windows installations.

    Please wait, since this may take a while...

    Successfully scanned Windows installations.
    Total identified Windows installations: 2
    [1] D:\Windows
    [2] G:\Windows
    The operation completed successfully.

    C:\>bootrec /rebuildbcd
    Scanning all disks for Windows installations.

    Please wait, since this may take a while...

    Successfully scanned Windows installations.
    Total identified Windows installations: 2
    [1] D:\Windows
    Add installation to boot list? Yes(Y)/No(N)/All(A):a
    The operation completed successfully.

    C:\>
    _____________________________________________________________________________

    After rebooting, I got the W10 version of the failed screen:

    Laptop SSD Failed Start Up - "Cannot be Repaired"-bootrec-rename-rebuild.jpg

    Tom
      My Computers


  4. Posts : 4,554
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit
       #14

    You will have to use Diskpart command to find out the System Reserved partition drive letter.



    Type bcdboot C:\Windows /s H: /f ALL and press Enter.


    Please replace partition letter C: with Windows installed partition letter. When computer boots into Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) environment the drive letter assign to Windows partition may not be C: drive letter because Windows 7, 8 , 8.1 and 10 creates a separate system partition when it's installed from scratch. The system partition contains boot files WinRE assigns the system partition the C: drive letter and the Windows installed partition will be assign any other drive letter usually D: drive letter is assign to Windows installed partition. The Bcdedit /enum | find "osdevice" command can be use to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 4,093
    Windows 7 HP 64 - Windows 10 Pro - Lubuntu
       #15

    Your HDD has windows 7 installed as Legacy - MBR
    Your SSD has Win 10 installed as Legacy - MBR

    On the SSD, the active partition is C: an normally it is the system partition.
    Did you changed the active partition?
      My Computers


  6. TJR
    Posts : 10
    10/7 Pro 64
    Thread Starter
       #16

    Thanks FreeBooter - OS10 is D: and System Reserved is H: - I ran the BCDBoot command as below, rebooted and still got the blue recovery screen. Here are the cmd results:

    Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.18362.356]
    (c) 2019 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

    X:\Sources>diskpart

    Microsoft DiskPart version 10.0.18362.1

    Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation.
    On computer: MININT-R0CMDMM

    DISKPART> list vol

    Volume ### Ltr Label Fs Type Size Status Info
    ---------- --- ----------- ----- ---------- ------- --------- --------
    Volume 0 G OS 7 NTFS Partition 99 GB Healthy
    Volume 1 F User Profil NTFS Partition 822 GB Healthy
    Volume 2 H System Rese NTFS Partition 500 MB Healthy
    Volume 3 D OS 10 NTFS Partition 213 GB Healthy
    Volume 4 I NTFS Partition 533 MB Healthy
    Volume 5 E Cruzer_Win1 NTFS Removable 14 GB Healthy
    Volume 6 FAT Partition 101 MB Healthy Hidden
    Volume 7 C RECOVERY NTFS Partition 8 GB Healthy Hidden

    DISKPART> exit

    Leaving DiskPart...

    X:\Sources>bcdboot D:\windows /s H: /f ALL
    Boot files successfully created.
    ___________________________________________________________________________

    Thanks Megahertz - I did not change the active partition intentionally, but I followed many steps suggested in the forum, so it is possible that one of the tools or steps may have resulted in the change. Should I make either the System Reserved or the OS partition the active partition instead?

    I appreciate all of the help - these technical details are beyond my knowledge - but I'm glad to learn!

    Tom
      My Computers


  7. Posts : 4,093
    Windows 7 HP 64 - Windows 10 Pro - Lubuntu
       #17

    FreeBooter is conducting well. He knows BCDBoot better then I do.
    I only think that, to X:\Sources>bcdboot D:\windows /s H: /f ALL work, H: must be set as active instead of D:
      My Computers


  8. Posts : 4,554
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit
       #18

    Make the System Reserve partition active.
      My Computer


  9. TJR
    Posts : 10
    10/7 Pro 64
    Thread Starter
       #19

    System Reserved is now active, but still getting recovery screen, so I re-ran the BCDboot commands with the new drive labels:

    BCDboot h:/windows /s d: /f all

    Still getting the recovery screen, ran startup repair, got "Could not repair" message, so I tried the Bootrec commands again:

    Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.18362.356]
    (c) 2019 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

    X:\Sources>diskpart

    Microsoft DiskPart version 10.0.18362.1

    Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation.
    On computer: MININT-4IEQ54B

    DISKPART> list vol

    Volume ### Ltr Label Fs Type Size Status Info
    ---------- --- ----------- ----- ---------- ------- --------- --------
    Volume 0 G OS 7 NTFS Partition 99 GB Healthy
    Volume 1 F User Profil NTFS Partition 822 GB Healthy
    Volume 2 D System Rese NTFS Partition 500 MB Healthy
    Volume 3 H OS 10 NTFS Partition 213 GB Healthy
    Volume 4 I NTFS Partition 533 MB Healthy
    Volume 5 E Cruzer_Win1 NTFS Removable 14 GB Healthy
    Volume 6 FAT Partition 101 MB Healthy Hidden
    Volume 7 C RECOVERY NTFS Partition 8 GB Healthy Hidden

    DISKPART> exit

    Leaving DiskPart...

    X:\Sources>bootrec /fixmbr
    The operation completed successfully.

    X:\Sources>bootrec /fixboot
    The volume does not contain a recognized file system.
    Please make sure that all required file system drivers are loaded and that the volume is not corrupted.

    X:\Sources>/scanos
    '/scanos' is not recognized as an internal or external command,
    operable program or batch file.

    X:\Sources>bootrec /scanos
    Scanning all disks for Windows installations.

    Please wait, since this may take a while...

    Successfully scanned Windows installations.
    Total identified Windows installations: 0
    The operation completed successfully.

    X:\Sources>bootrec /rebuildbcd
    Scanning all disks for Windows installations.

    Please wait, since this may take a while...

    Successfully scanned Windows installations.
    Total identified Windows installations: 0
    The operation completed successfully.
    ____________________________________________

    As you can see, Fixboot failed again and ScanOS is showing no installed systems.

    Is there a process (short of having to re-install W10 & all programs) to repair or replace the corrupted or missing system files?

    Tom
      My Computers


  10. Posts : 4,554
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit
       #20

    Sorry i'm out of ideas its best you reinstall Windows 10.
      My Computer


 

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