Reset BIOS so that it first checks CD/DVD drives, & then boots normal

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  1. Posts : 897
    windows 10 professional 64-bit, 21H2
    Thread Starter
       #11

    Ghot said:
    Above, the dark pic... see the yellow dots? When you click on those words, it'll look something like my BIOS screen below.
    You'll have eight slots to back up your BIOS.
    When you get everything working the way you want...SAVE the BIOS to one of the slots.

    Then if you ever need to "go back", you can just LOAD that profile you saved earlier.


    Attachment 323699
    Thank you again. I will try to save profiles. However, it's still not set up correctly. When I loaded the defaults, which allows me to boot to Windows 10, the options are:
    Reset BIOS so that it first checks CD/DVD drives, & then boots normal-image.png
    The boot manager doesn't look at the optical drives first, so the first 2 options boot to Windows directly. Options 3 & 4 are the optical drives. However, if I put either of them first, save & exit, I get the message about a "press any key...floppy drive" & I have to go back to the BIOS & change it or I keep getting that message. When I put either of them first & have a rescue disk in, then it will boot to Macrium Reflect. However, as soon as I take the disk out & exit Reflect, I get the message about press any key.

    (The flash drive was only there so I could take a picture of my BIOS settings. This last time, I restarted, pressed Del until I got to the BIOS screen, & then put the flash drive in so I could press F12 to take a picture. I normally don't have the flash drive in).
      My Computers


  2. Posts : 17,744
    Win 10 Home 10.0.19044.1706 (x64) [21H2]
       #12

    phrab said:
    Thank you again. I will try to save profiles. However, it's still not set up correctly. When I loaded the defaults, which allows me to boot to Windows 10, the options are:
    Reset BIOS so that it first checks CD/DVD drives, & then boots normal-image.png
    The boot manager doesn't look at the optical drives first, so the first 2 options boot to Windows directly. Options 3 & 4 are the optical drives. However, if I put either of them first, save & exit, I get the message about a "press any key...floppy drive" & I have to go back to the BIOS & change it or I keep getting that message. When I put either of them first & have a rescue disk in, then it will boot to Macrium Reflect. However, as soon as I take the disk out & exit Reflect, I get the message about press any key.

    (The flash drive was only there so I could take a picture of my BIOS settings. This last time, I restarted, pressed Del until I got to the BIOS screen, & then put the flash drive in so I could press F12 to take a picture. I normally don't have the flash drive in).


    You'll probably have to ask Gigabyte about the floppy thing.
    I've been on ASUS motherboards for 21 years. They don't do that.

    Sometimes ya just gotta call the motherboard manufacturer. I've had to do it too.


    But the F8 key should hold you over, until you can call them.


    This is just a guess, but have you tried setting the boot priorities with only one optical drive hooked up?
    Maybe the BIOS isn't expecting you to have two optical drives that you might want to boot to.

    That's kind of what I meant when I said, in post #2...

    When things start going wonky...having the comp able to boot from either of two optical drives will get messy.

    90% of the world doesn't even use optical drives as boot devices anymore. And I know of no one that tries it with TWO.
    Maybe... that's what's confusing the BIOS. Maybe the BIOS thinks the 2nd optical drive is a floppy disk?
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  3. Posts : 17,744
    Win 10 Home 10.0.19044.1706 (x64) [21H2]
       #13

    You also have this on the Peripherals tab...

    The SATA controllers should be enabled.
    SATA Mode should be set to AHCI
    And all the SATA "Ports" should be enabled.

    That's the only other SATA stuff I can find in your BIOS.





    Reset BIOS so that it first checks CD/DVD drives, & then boots normal-image1.png








    @bobkn I'm out of ideas. OP wants to set boot priority like so...

    optical drive
    optical drive
    then the OS SSD 2.5"

    It just isn't working.


    Motherboard manual: GA-Z170X-Gaming 7 (rev. 1.0) Support | Motherboard - GIGABYTE Global





    I'm gonna go check something in MY BIOS... brb.
    Last edited by Ghot; 19 Mar 2021 at 23:50.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 17,744
    Win 10 Home 10.0.19044.1706 (x64) [21H2]
       #14

    @phrab


    Ok go into the BIOS and click on the YELLOW dot item, and take a screenshot of what you see.

    I can't see the details in your manual.




    Reset BIOS so that it first checks CD/DVD drives, & then boots normal-image1.png



    I think we finally found the problem... the BBS priorities.
    BUT, I have never messed with them in my life.

    See bottom of post #13
    And post #11


    OP is getting a screenshot of Hard Drive BBS Priorities, right now.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 4,585
    Windows 10 Pro
       #15

    Not sure why you would want it to search your DVD drive 1st, you could do that by bringing up the Boot Menu at 1st Boot.

    Have you set your Bios back to defaults yet ?

    I have not read every reply so...
      My Computers


  6. Posts : 17,744
    Win 10 Home 10.0.19044.1706 (x64) [21H2]
       #16

    AddRAM said:
    Not sure why you would want it to search your DVD drive 1st, you could do that by bringing up the Boot Menu at 1st Boot.

    Have you set your Bios back to defaults yet ?


    Yeah we did that. that always works on an ASUS board, as far as the HDD BBS priorities go.

    In MY BIOS I have TWO BBS Priorities lists... one for HDDs and another for everything else.
    I THINK his are all on one list.


    He keeps getting some floppy error w/e he puts the optical drive or drives first in the boot order.

    And then, going through his manual, I notice the pic in post #14


    He should be back any second, he's pretty fast with the screenshots.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 26,353
    Win11 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu
       #17

    He should try setting his BIOS up for UEFI boot(windows 8/10 features), turning off legacy(storage boot option control) and my question is: Are both dvd drives internal? Or is one of them external?
      My Computers


  8. Posts : 17,744
    Win 10 Home 10.0.19044.1706 (x64) [21H2]
       #18

    Cliff S said:
    He should try setting his BIOS up for UEFI boot(windows 8/10 features), turning off legacy(storage boot option control) and my question is: Are both dvd drives internal? Or is one of them external?


    I think they're both internal.
    I have no idea what Windows 8/10 features are.
    I've been on AMD/ASUS mobos for 20 years.
    And, I've been up for 24 hours.. Instacart's fault.
    OP is online, I just PMd him to come back to topic.

    His motherboard has a great manual. 33.9 MB
    Anything and everything except the BBS Priorities. :/
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 17,744
    Win 10 Home 10.0.19044.1706 (x64) [21H2]
       #19

    The error he keeps getting is about a floppy. Notice in the BBS Priorities description... floppy. Wth !!


    Reset BIOS so that it first checks CD/DVD drives, & then boots normal-image1.png


    So I asked him to clcik on the yellow dot and get a screen shot.


    MY BBS Priorities has my SSD and my two HDDs in one list, and my DVD in the other list... that's it.
    There's really nothing to mess around with.




    /edit

    I wonder if he has an external floppy? His motherboard doesn't have a floppy connector.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 26,353
    Win11 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu
       #20

    Windows 8/10 features is the equivalent to this in an ROG board I think.
    Reset BIOS so that it first checks CD/DVD drives, & then boots normal-image.png

    That with the changing floppy disk letter is only going to make a difference inside of Windows, BIOS and CMOS don't read from Windows,
    Boot Process

    First the power is supplied to the CPU. The processor, the CPU, is hard coded to look at a special memory address for code that it can execute. This memory address contains a pointer which tells the processor where to find the BIOS program.

    The next process that occurs is that the CPU loads the BIOS program. The first BIOS process that occurs is POST or Power On Self Test. POST first verifies the integrity of the BIOS code. If the integrity of the BIOS code is good, it then looks for the BIOS on the video card. This allows a display signal to be sent to our monitor so we can see what’s happening during the power on process. Once that’s done it checks for other BIOS programs, such as hard disk controllers and loads those. The last process that occurs during POST is device check. The POST program goes through the system and checks all of the basic devices that are needed for the system to run. Such devices are memory, the keyboard and so on. We can notice when the POST checks our memory when we turn on our PC. We can see the memory counter up in the top left corner of the screen. That’s the POST testing our memory, seeing how much memory is installed in the system.

    After the POST tests are complete the BIOS identifies other system devices. It uses the information contained in CMOS chip, and information supplied by the devices themselves to identify and configure hardware devices. At this point that our plug-and-play devices are allocated system resources.

    The BIOS then searches for a boot drive using the boot order specified in the CMOS Setup Program. We can go into CMOS Setup Program and specify which device we want to boot from. Options can be DVD drive first, hard drive first, floppy drive first, flash drive. etc. The BIOS will search for boot device using configured boot order. On the boot device the BIOS searches for the master boot loader and then loads the boot loader program. At this point the BIOS stops controlling the system as control is then passed to the boot loader program.

    The boot loader program is configured to locate and load an operating system of our boot device, whether it’s a CD, DVD or hard disk. It will try to find the operating system and load its kernel. As the operating system loads, additional steps are taken to load additional programs and configure devices for use by the operating system.
    CMOS, BIOS and Boot Process – Utilize Windows
    Note   Note
    CMOS is what most people call a BIOS Profile, as the profiles-settings are stored on the chip, which is why you need a CMOS battery to retain the information.
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