UPS Battery Backup power quality  

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  1. Posts : 230
    W10
       #1

    UPS Battery Backup power quality


    I know many members here have a lot of money wrapped up in their computers and other electronics. Many of you most likely have your equipment plugged into a UPS for protection from power spikes, brownouts, and power outages.
    You always hear that electronics need clean power. Typical utility power is less than 3% THD(Total Harmonic Distortion), which is rated as clean power.

    I'm sure a lot of you also use a generator during power outages. I do as well.
    I have two UPS units, one is a CyberPower 1500VA AVR, the other is an APC 1500 Back-UPS XS. These are the "Line Interactive type of UPS systems. The typical UPS you will find at your local computer store.

    I recently purchased a Fluke Power Analyzer to do some testing and decided to see how clean the power is from my UPS units.
    The results were shocking! I think I'm going to be shopping for double conversion pure sinewave UPS units soon.
    Here are the results of the output of my UPS units running on battery power.
    APC:
    UPS Battery Backup power quality-apc-sine-wave.jpgUPS Battery Backup power quality-apc-thd.jpg
    CyberPower
    UPS Battery Backup power quality-cyberpower-sine-wave.jpgUPS Battery Backup power quality-cyberpower-thd.jpg
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 14,928
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 22H2 Build 19045.2965
       #2

    Before spending money you might want to make certain that the shape of the waveform is not a limitation of your measurement method.

    If it's not a measurement issue, you might also want to make certain that the blocky nature of the waveform has significance for your equipment. If it makes no difference to it then there's no point spending any money.

    Best of luck,
    Denis
    Last edited by Try3; 19 Mar 2021 at 17:03.
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  3. Posts : 2,585
    Win 11 Pro
       #3

    I wonder how much of that really matters. I've dealt with high power networking computer room UPS systems but those systems are much different - the one we had converted the incoming 3 phase 240 VAC to DC voltage that kept the batteries charged and then converted the DC voltage back to 480VAC to feed the power transformer for the computer room.

    That would be the ideal method but the small "consumer" UPS systems don't work that way. I have an APC Back UPS PRO BR 1350VA UPS for my recording studio desktop and recording audio interface unit. I don't find any audio issues (noise, distortion, spikes, etc.) when using the equipment on "battery".
      My Computers


  4. Posts : 2,068
    Windows 10 Pro
       #4

    I run my equipment off a UPS. I have a handful of UPS's in my house. I figured that "has" to be better than the power from the wall, so I never cared to look into it any further. My son ran his rig for well over a year without a UPS and it's still going strong.

    I'm Running an APC Back-Ups 1500VA (BN1500M2). My son is running a Cyber Power 1350VA that we got from CostCo. Still gotta pick up a unit for my wife.
      My Computers


  5. Posts : 98
    Win 10 Pro 64b 22H2
       #5

    Sine wave power is important to certain types of loads, specifically those that are inductive. Like transformer based power supplies and motors. So if you want to run these types of devices on a UPS that would be a consideration to look for a true sine wave converter.

    However, virtually all newer electronic devices use a switching power supply to convert incoming AC to device DC, and these types of supplies work very well on a non-sine wave power source. So if you just want to run a PC, monitor, router, switch, NFS, printer, etc off a UPS having a true sine wave converter vs a standard step approximation waveform would be a waste of money. You will pay extra for true sine wave, and it is NOT required to run modern electronics.

    So save your money for something useful, like beer.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 5,294
    Windows 7 HP - Windows 10 Pro - Lubuntu
       #6

    AK6DN said:
    Sine wave power is important to certain types of loads, specifically those that are inductive. Like transformer based power supplies and motors. So if you want to run these types of devices on a UPS that would be a consideration to look for a true sine wave converter.

    However, virtually all newer electronic devices use a switching power supply to convert incoming AC to device DC, and these types of supplies work very well on a non-sine wave power source. So if you just want to run a PC, monitor, router, switch, NFS, printer, etc off a UPS having a true sine wave converter vs a standard step approximation waveform would be a waste of money. You will pay extra for true sine wave, and it is NOT required to run modern electronics.
    So save your money for something useful, like beer.


    UPS converts AC to DC, store energy on a battery and then convert it back to AC.
    The DC to AC can result on a square wave (cheap UPS) or a sine wave (expensive UPS).

    As mentioned, for a switching power supply, it doesn't matter it the input is square wave or a sine wave as the first step of a switching power supply is to rectify the input, and filter with a capacitor.
      My Computers


  7. Posts : 5,025
    Windows 10/11 Pro x64, Various Linux Builds, Networking, Storage, Cybersecurity Specialty.
       #7

    @Megahertz

    Update.

    If I remove the battery from my UPS, still connected to AC, the internal circuity still produces a near perfect Sine Wave.
    It's all in the design and engineering. There are a bunch of inferior products out there.

    Always buy a UPS with a clean Sine Wave output.

      My Computer


  8. Posts : 98
    Win 10 Pro 64b 22H2
       #8

    Compumind said:
    @Megahertz

    Update.

    If I remove the battery from my UPS, still connected to AC, the internal circuity still produces a near perfect Sine Wave.
    It's all in the design and engineering. There are a bunch of inferior products out there.

    Always buy a UPS with a clean Sine Wave output.

    If you remove the battery from the UPS then you are just seeing the input AC line waveform.
    On an inexpensive home UPS AC/DC/AC conversion will not be done with no battery present.
    So without the battery, your UPS is basically a big NOP.
    Well it does likely have a surge suppressor in it as well.
    But it is not doing what you think it is.

    Watch this: EEVblog #504 - UPS Tutorial & Teardown - YouTube

    Your home UPS is either an 'offline standby' (cheap) or 'line interactive' (moderate) model.
    Only a high end 'online / dual conversion' (expensive) model does true AC/DC/AC conversion.

    My mid/high end Cyberpower 1500VA UPC specification:
    UPS Battery Backup power quality-capture.png

    Note the 'Transfer Time' spec of 4ms.
    This means it is not an AC/DC/AC converter, which would have a zero transfer time.
    It is a 'line interactive' operative model. Also note the block diagram.

    For reference my CP1500 'line interactive' UPS at 1500VA costs about US$200.
    CyberPower has full 1500VA 'dual conversion' AC/DC/AC models, but they go for about US$1200 or more.
    Last edited by AK6DN; 13 Jan 2023 at 19:24.
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 5,025
    Windows 10/11 Pro x64, Various Linux Builds, Networking, Storage, Cybersecurity Specialty.
       #9

    @AK6DN -

    All my UPS units do the correct raw AC (dirty) to clean AC Sinewave conversion even without the battery.
    APC units, very high end, Double Conversion.

    FWIW.

      My Computer


  10. Posts : 98
    Win 10 Pro 64b 22H2
       #10

    Compumind said:
    @AK6DN -

    All my UPS units do the correct raw AC (dirty) to clean AC Sinewave conversion even without the battery.
    APC units, very high end, Double Conversion.

    FWIW.

    Ok, but I still think you wasted your money on those devices.

    They are AC/DC switching power supplies that are feeding a high power oscillator (ie, 120V/1000W at 60Hz).
    Then you feed that AC to a second rank of AC/DC switching power supplies.
    All you have done is created inefficiency (wasted power since no conversion is 100% efficient) in doing the AC/DC/AC conversion unnecessarily.

    The switcher in your UPS is really no different than the switcher in your PC, just a different output setpoint (ie, 24VDC or 48VDC or whatever) vs 12V/5V/3.3V/1.XV outputs in your PC.
    AC sinewave power is really only critical if you are using a transformer in the power path; and virtually no switchers do that any more.

    What you are doing is not bad, it is just more expensive and basically unnecessary.
      My Computer


 

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