Secondary drive marked as System + Black screen

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  1. Posts : 18,044
    Win 10 Pro 64-bit v1909 - Build 18363 Custom ISO Install
       #11

    Hello @Holton,

    FreeBooter said:
    The Bcdedit | find "osdevice" command can be use to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.

    If you wanted a more detailed output of the above, you can use . . .

    Code:
    
    bcdedit /enum OSLOADER
    bcdedit /enum OSLOADER /v

    I hope this helps.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 42,961
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #12

    Hi, you seem to have raised the same issue in the other thread. It is not advisable to repeat the same issue like this.

    Is there some reason you abandoned that thread?

    A possible approach is to disconnect all but your system disk and boot your PC from a Win 10 install disk.
    Click Repair Your Computer and navigate to Startup Repair.
    If that completes succesfully, remove the install disk and try to boot your PC.

    If ok, you need to then remove the active and boot attributes from the other disk.
      My Computers


  3. Posts : 18,432
    Windows 11 Pro
       #13

    Your easiest solution is going to be:
    Code:
    diskpart
    select vol c
    active
    exit
    bcdboot C:\Windows /s C: /f BIOS
    That will make your C: drive bootable and you don't have to mess with anything else. We'll, except changing which drive computer boots from in BIOS.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 5
    Win 10 Pro build 18363.1316
    Thread Starter
       #14

    FreeBooter,

    Ahh it's a little bit complicated, so I tried the:

    dalchina said:
    A possible approach is to disconnect all but your system disk and boot your PC from a Win 10 install disk.
    Click Repair Your Computer and navigate to Startup Repair.
    If that completes succesfully, remove the install disk and try to boot your PC.
    That didn't work. Windows fixing tool said that It cannot fix it so I think I should try:
    diskpart
    select vol c
    active
    exit
    bcdboot C
    :\Windows /s C:/f BIOS
    But can I try this in cmd with loaded windows?
    After this I have to change in bios which drive system should boot and I assume that I'll have to deactive D partition?
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 18,432
    Windows 11 Pro
       #15

    Yes, you can do the commands with Windows loaded.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 18,432
    Windows 11 Pro
       #16

    Holton said:
    [FONT="]FreeBooter,

    [/FONT]
    Ahh it's a little bit complicated, so I tried the:


    That didn't work. Windows fixing tool said that It cannot fix it so I think I should try:
    diskpart
    select vol c
    active
    exit
    bcdboot C
    :\Windows /s C:/f BIOS
    But can I try this in cmd with loaded windows?
    After this I have to change in bios which drive system should boot and I assume that I'll have to deactive D partition?
    Note you are missing a space in the command. It is:
    bcdboot C:\Windows /s C: /f BIOS
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 1,612
    11, 10, 8.1 and 7 all Professional versions, and Linux Mint
       #17

    That didn't work. Windows fixing tool said that It cannot fix it so I think I should try:
    diskpart
    select vol c
    active
    exit
    bcdboot C:\Windows /s C:/f BIOS
    But can I try this in cmd with loaded windows?
    As far as I can see, the whole situation is a real mix-up

    According to one of your attached screenshots one of the disks is GPT partitioned and is shown on that screenshot as the
    disk with the partition lettered E. That is on your post 6. Whilst it is not critical, as it would be if that was the OS disk, you have only 18GB of free space on a 1TB drive.

    The other three disks are shown as MBR partition. On the same screenshot the disk 4 with the partition lettered C and presumably Windows - is shown as boot - but that disk appears only to contain the main Windows C - and no system partition. Whilst the active and system label is shown on disk 2 with the partition labelled D.

    I am personally unsure of the best way forward, but referring to the quote - above - where you indicate that windows can still actually be booted into - were it to be me I think I would go for an attempted repair install of windows on the disk with the partition lettered C - creating first a system partition of 500MB

    Without the system partition you may well encounter problems further down the line with version updates etc.
    That recommendation - is made ONLY if you are sure you have an image to which you can return if something goes wrong. and ONLY because you say earlier in the topic
    Reinstall is not my target option.
    IMHO however the far better proposition is a completely clean install to that disk from a deleted partitions - and then the copying back of your personal data. Of course you would then have to reinstall all your apps etc. As indeed has been mentioned earlier in the topic.

    That all said, I will leave you with the help of my colleagues who have assisted you since my one previous post. It is no benefit to you to have multiple people posting advice on an issue of this nature.

    Good luck with it I have only posted again to point out that to me - the situation I see on your screenshots is a bit of a mix-up and I find it a little difficult to interpret all the results of screenshots as some of course are in your native language such as those of disk management.
    It certainly appears that Windows boot manager is on the disk with the partition lettered D
      My Computer


 

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