Scanning and repairing drive on every start-up

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  1. Posts : 11,318
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 21H2 Build 19044.1706
       #21

    Melannin,

    What is that Disk 1 [the RAW drive]? Have you tried setting it up and then seeing what happens when you run that chkdsk command on it?

    What is that Disk 4 [drive G]? Have you tried removing it?



    I do not understand your problems with the Repair install procedure.
    I've been trying to get this to work, but starting setup.exe gives me a "Something happened" error. Stating: "Sorry, we're having trouble determining if your PC can run Windows 10. Please close Setup and try again."
    Starting setup.exe from the sources folder gives error code "0x80070490". I've tried several things already, but nothing seems to work.
    - What media is the installation 'disk' / ISO on?
    - How did you make it?
    - Are you sure it matches your x86 / x64 Windows installation?

    Denis
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #22

    So to be clear, you assigned a drive letter to every partition that did not have one, using the MiniTools Partition Wizard, and then followed the instructions given in post #10 to run mountvol again.

    Looking at Disk Management, there should have been 3 partitions that did not have drive letters.
    Last edited by OldNavyGuy; 03 Jul 2020 at 14:54.
      My Computer


  3. TV2
    Posts : 2,009
    W10 Pro 20H2
       #23



    I'm not sure what your original problem was that requires you to know the disk identity. But it seems you are either trying to install Windows 10 or Upgrade Windows 10.
    If this is the case:

    Disk 1 above could be your problem. It is marked as RAW - meaning it either does not have a Partition Table (File Table)- or the Partition Table was corrupted.
    This disk is also marked Active. That designation can confuse the OS as to where it is to install.
    (Hopefully you did not have important data on that disk)

    I suggest you disconnect that disk from the PC, either by unplugging the Data Cable or the SATA Power Cable to it. Then try to do whatever it is you are trying to do.
    In fact, you should disconnect all extra disks when you are installing Windows - only the disk/drive you want Windows installed on should be connected. Disk 2 above should be the only drive connected.
    This solves a multitude of problems that can happen in a system with multiple disks.

    Give that a shot.
      My Computers


  4. Posts : 15,979
    Win 10 Pro 64-bit v1909 - Build 18363 Custom ISO Install
       #24

    TV2 said:
    I suggest you disconnect that disk from the PC, either by unplugging the Data Cable or the SATA Power Cable to it. Then try to do whatever it is you are trying to do.

    In fact, you should disconnect all extra disks when you are installing Windows - only the disk/drive you want Windows installed on should be connected. Disk 2 above should be the only drive connected.

    This solves a multitude of problems that can happen in a system with multiple disks.
    I agree.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #25

    Problem outlined in post #1 with screenshot of the issue -

    Milennin said:
    Recently, I had a start-up error with the "Reboot and select proper Boot device" message. I fixed it by unplugging and then plugging back in my drives, but since then it has been slow with starting up Windows, attempting to scan and repair an unknown drive before the login screen.

    I need help to figure out which disk it is referring to and how to get rid of the scan and repair thing on start-up.
    Bouncing between two threads currently.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 11,318
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 21H2 Build 19044.1706
       #26

    Melannin,

    Consolidating your two separate threads into a single one has created a complete mess. I do not know who asked for this to be done & I do not think it should have been done.

    Please respond to what is now my post #21 in this thread.

    If there is no immediate solution, I recommend that you
    - check your Win10 installation disk works,
    - check that your system imaging application's boot disk works,
    - reinstall Windows 10,
    - restore the C:\ drive [only] from your system image onto the C:\ drive of the new installation.

    Denis
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #27

    Try3 said:
    Consolidating your two separate threads into a single one has created a complete mess. I do not know who asked for this to be done & I do not think it should have been done.
    Apparently, a moderator did.

    IMO, you advising the OP to start a new thread on the same subject matter, and keeping both threads active, should not have been done.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 11,318
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 21H2 Build 19044.1706
       #28

    OldNavyGuy said:
    Apparently, a moderator did.

    IMO, you advising the OP to start a new thread on the same subject matter, and keeping both threads active, should not have been done.

    You have only yourself to blame for the result.
    But it wasn't the same subject matter.
    The 2nd thread was specifically about how to idenify a volume.
    Resolving that question is seperate from the 1st question about how to stop automatic scanning at reboot.

    Denis
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #29

    Problem definition is asking the who, what, where, when, why, and how questions.

    We know "who" (OP) and "where" (on the OP's system, and no others).

    Identifying the "what" (symptom...a GUID displays an unidentified volume being scanned and repaired on every reboot), leads into the "when" (on reboot).

    "How" to recreate is...reboot the system.

    Identifying the GUID can lead to the "why".

    An opportunity was missed to tie that all together in a single coherent thread.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 889
    W10-2009 19042.1348
       #30

    I've no idea if this will help: following a suggestion found here:
    Displaying the Volume GUID of a volume | Morgan Simonsen's Blog
    pasting the volume name into the 'run' box (Start>rt-click) will try to open the volume in Explorer. In my case, one of the 'no mount points' volumes was disallowed ('you are not permitted...'), but the other opened the Recovery volume - not that I could do anything with it, as all sub-folders were blocked. The alternative suggestion on that web page, of entering the volumename in the explorer address bar, always failed.

    Update: further digging found (here) that Powershell can show more info about a given volume. The command
    Code:
    GWMI -namespace root\cimv2 -class win32_volume | FL -property DriveLetter, label, capacity, DeviceID
    will list the volumes, along with drive letter (if it has one), label (so the Recovery drive is shown as such) and (more usefully, maybe) capacity (in bytes). This latter can then be matched to other sources of info, eg Disk Management, to pin down which drive it is. In my case, the second 'no mount pt' volume was the 99MB EFI partition.
    Last edited by mngerhold; 04 Jul 2020 at 07:07.
      My Computer


 

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