Scanning and repairing drive on every start-up

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  1. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #11

    The mounvol command I posted will give him the drive letter associated with the GUID he's seeing on boot.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 1,409
    Windows 10 Pro
       #12

    Milennin said:
    I fixed it by unplugging and then plugging back in my drives, but since then it has been slow with starting up Windows, attempting to scan and repair an unknown drive before the login screen.

    Don't reconnect all drives, just reconnect the OS/system drive (C:\). Then reconnect the drives one-by-one, and reboot each time.

    Warning : Be prepared for worst case scenario ... 2 possibilities : borked OS and/or failing drive.

    Make sure all your personal data is backed up. If you can't get in through Windows, create and use a Linux distro boot USB (mu preference, Mint) and run from USB (do NOT install). Gives you a Windows-like environment and copy > paste personal data to an external drive.
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  3. Posts : 11,357
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 21H2 Build 19044.1706
       #13

    Milennin,

    While you are waiting, please would you post a screenshot of your Disk mgmt
    How to post a screenshot of Disk management - TenForumsTutorials
    This advice is very useful because it avoids posting images that fail to convey the necessary information

    How to upload and post screenshots and files - TenForumsTutorials
    How to remove a screenshot or image from a TenForums post - TenForumsTutorials

    Denis
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 53
    Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #14

    OldNavyGuy said:
    "I need help to figure out which disk it is referring to and how to get rid of the scan and repair thing on start-up"
    Open a Command prompt.
    Enter mountvol
    Once you get the drive letter, run the following in an elevated Command prompt to see if the "dirty bit" has been set on that drive.
    In the format -
    fsutil dirty query DriveLetter:
    Example -
    fsutil dirty query c:
    I just did that and it shows me several drives that say "NO MOUNT POINTS".
    I checked the labelled volumes, and none are dirty, but checking g: gives me a parameter incorrect. (it's the USB Drive, which is normally empty, so I guess that's normal)

    idgat said:
    Don't reconnect all drives, just reconnect the OS/system drive (C:\). Then reconnect the drives one-by-one, and reboot each time.
    Warning : Be prepared for worst case scenario ... 2 possibilities : borked OS and/or failing drive.
    Make sure all your personal data is backed up. If you can't get in through Windows, create and use a Linux distro boot USB (mu preference, Mint) and run from USB (do NOT install). Gives you a Windows-like environment and copy > paste personal data to an external drive.
    Yeah, I might have done that wrong. I reconnected them all in one go. Windows still starts, it's just slow on start-up, and does the scan and repair thing from the screenshot in my first post every time before reaching the login screen. I've also noticed there's a several second delay when I click "Shut down" from the Start menu that used to not be there.
    But yeah, I'll make sure to back-up my stuff.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Scanning and repairing drive on every start-up-mountvol.png  
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  5. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #15

    "I just did that and it shows me several drives that say "NO MOUNT POINTS"."

    Those are devices that were once connected, but no longer are.

    The second Volume GUID in the list is the one displaying on your screen shot in post #1.

    I would suggest downloading Nirsoft's registry scanning tool RegScanner.

    https://www.nirsoft.net/utils/regscanner.html

    Run mounvol again from the Command prompt with this addition -

    mountvol > "%userprofile%\Desktop\MountVolResults.txt"

    This will create a text file on your Desktop called MountVolResults.txt

    Open the text file and copy the GUID inside the left and right brackets.

    Paste that into the Find string box in RegScanner and then select Registry item contains the specified string from the Matching dropdown.

    Click Scan

    RegScanner wil give you all the results it finds in the registry (as opposed to "one at a time" with regedit).

    Should be some clues on what may be causing the issue.
    Last edited by OldNavyGuy; 03 Jul 2020 at 05:15.
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  6. Posts : 11,357
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 21H2 Build 19044.1706
       #16

    Aren't the 'no mount points' entries the system-related partitions [that have no drive letter] rather than volumes that are no longer connected?

    A Repair install procedure should fix those partitions. Despite its name, it is a repair procedure not an installation procedure.
    Repair Install Windows 10 with an In-place Upgrade - TenForumsTutorials

    Denis
      My Computer


  7. TV2
    Posts : 2,009
    W10 Pro 20H2
       #17

    Could we see a screenshot of your Disk Management?

    Disk Management - How to Post a Screenshot of

    Also: the identification of the volume it is trying to repair looks like the identification we see in the registry for disks.
    You could try searching the registry for that volume identification number, and if you find it, see if you can determine which physical disk it is that way.
    For search I think you only need to look for 11f7f937-
      My Computers


  8. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #18

    Easy to determine if it's a drive partition, or something else.

    Download and run the free tool MiniTool Partition Wizard.

    On partitions with no drive letter, right-click and select Change letter.

    Assign a letter.

    Click the Apply button in the lower left-hand corner after each change.

    When you're done, run mountvol and match any letter you added, with the GUID screenshot in post #1.

    If there is no match, it's something else.
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 53
    Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #19

    OldNavyGuy said:
    "I just did that and it shows me several drives that say "NO MOUNT POINTS"."
    Those are devices that were once connected, but no longer are.
    The second Volume GUID in the list is the one displaying on your screen shot in post #1.
    I would suggest downloading Nirsoft's registry scanning tool RegScanner.
    https://www.nirsoft.net/utils/regscanner.html
    I did this, ending up with a bunch of different items listed, but I don't know what I'm supposed to look for.

    Try3 said:
    Aren't the 'no mount points' entries the system-related partitions [that have no drive letter] rather than volumes that are no longer connected?
    A Repair install procedure should fix those partitions. Despite its name, it is a repair procedure not an installation procedure.
    Repair Install Windows 10 with an In-place Upgrade - TenForumsTutorials
    Denis
    I've been trying to get this to work, but starting setup.exe gives me a "Something happened" error. Stating: "Sorry, we're having trouble determining if your PC can run Windows 10. Please close Setup and try again."
    Starting setup.exe from the sources folder gives error code "0x80070490". I've tried several things already, but nothing seems to work.

    TV2 said:
    Could we see a screenshot of your Disk Management?
    Disk Management - How to Post a Screenshot of
    Also: the identification of the volume it is trying to repair looks like the identification we see in the registry for disks.
    You could try searching the registry for that volume identification number, and if you find it, see if you can determine which physical disk it is that way.
    For search I think you only need to look for 11f7f937-
    I'll link a screenshot of Disk Management.

    Looking at that number (11f7f937-), it matches with one of the "NO MOUNT POINTS" from my mountvol search. How does that happen?

    OldNavyGuy said:
    Easy to determine if it's a drive partition, or something else.
    Download and run the free tool MiniTool Partition Wizard.
    On partitions with no drive letter, right-click and select Change letter.
    Assign a letter.
    Click the Apply button in the lower left-hand corner after each change.
    When you're done, run mountvol and match any letter you added, with the GUID screenshot in post #1.
    If there is no match, it's something else.
    Nope, nothing.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Scanning and repairing drive on every start-up-disk-management.png  
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 11,357
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 21H2 Build 19044.1706
       #20

    Milennin,

    I no longer believe that you are going to get a positive identification of the partition referred to by that volume GUID.

    I'm making my future posts back in your original thread from now on.
    Scanning and repairing drive on every start-up

    Denis
      My Computer


 

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