5TB drive only showing as 561.53GB

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  1. Posts : 9,738
    Windows 10 Home 64bit Version 21H2
       #51

    Megahertz said:
    In this thread it was solved with an appropriate driver.
    That is why I'm asking to install the chipset drivers.
    Yes, in that thread my recommendation was "So search for the new driver install it and then check."

    The OP could not find any updated AMD AHCI driver. He uninstalled it and installed the default Windows AHCI driver and the problem got resolved.

    In general, when users reported a problem of this nature Microsoft has recommended that they should update the Intel RST driver and in turn we had recommended the same. Updating the RST driver resolved the problem in most cases. Intel recommends that the updates if any should be from the PC manufacturer's website since they can modify the Intel version to suit their specific model/ configuration.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 290
    Windows 10 Pro (x64) 21H1 (OS Build 19043.1165)
    Thread Starter
       #52

    Megahertz said:
    In this thread it was solved with an appropriate driver.
    That is why I'm asking to install the chipset drivers.
    Question: The chipset drivers are OS specific - yes - or did you mean the motherboard chipset drivers?

    The current Windows 10 installation (on the 240GB SSD) is working fine (currently writing this post on the Win 10 installation on the SSD).

    To try to get the 5TB HDD showing full capacity, I'd need to install this internally as the only HDD and boot off the Windows 7 CD/DVD into the Recovery Environment - yes?

    If, or when, the 5TB HDD is recognised as having 5TB of disk space, it wouldn't be bootable as I've tried re-partitioning & re-formatting the drive.

    I can't see how updating/re-installing the chipset driver would help.

    Can you explain please?

    Compumind said:
    @ArthurDent -

    So where do we stand on this, mate?

    About to re-connect the 5TB internally together with the Win 10 SSD boot drive and run Partition Master and see what that throws up.

    I ran the System File Checker on the Win 10 installation from an elevated Command Prompt to make sure that was OK after first running the Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool to check that all the files were intact (command: DISM.exe /Online /Cleanup-image /Restorehealth)

    If that fails, I'll try your suggestion of yesterday to remove the SSD and attempt a clean install of Windows 10 to see if that works.

    Failing that, it is try to wipe the drive from Linux as per Drew's suggestion.

    In parallel with this, I fired off an email to Toshiba's Warranty Support yesterday asking how I can access the full 5TB when the OS can only "see" 561.53GB.

    In the spirit of sharing information, I found this yesterday:
    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/win...ibility-update

    Also ...

    After checking in the BIOS to see that the HDD Access Mode hasn't been changed (options are IDE/SATA/AHCI/RAID) and try changing this back to the original setting if it has been altered.

    Then try the following:

    Boot from the CD/DVD into the Windows Recovery Environment, go to a commend prompt and type in:

    'bcdedit' which will display the values for Windows Boot Manager. If device is listed as 'unknown' type in the following commands:

    • bcdedit set {DEFAULT.EN_US} device partition=c:
    • bcdedit set {DEFAULT.EN_US} osdevice partition=c:
    • bcdedit set {BOOTMGR.EN_US} device partition=c:

    Other things to try ...

    Boot from the CD/DVD into the Windows Recovery Environment, go to a commend prompt and type in:

    • Bootrec.exe /fixmbr
    • Bootrec.exe /fixboot (and possibly also)
    • Bootrec.exe /rebuildBCD

    Still several things to try.

    Art

    - - - Updated - - -

    Okay. Some further info.

    Gigabyte site (to update motherboard drivers):

    https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard...driver-chipset

    There are two downloads available under 'chipset' applicable to Windows 10:

    Intel Management Engine Interface ver. 11.0.0.1158

    and

    Intel INF installation ver. 10.1.1.8

    (both dating from mid-2017)

    and two downloads available under 'chipset' applicable to Windows 7:

    Intel Management Engine Interface ver. 9.5.15.1730

    and

    Intel INF installation ver. 9.4.0.1027

    (both of these dating from the end of 2013)

    There are also some drivers for the SATA RAID/AHCI interface, however none are applicable to Windows 10 (the latest OS is Win 8.1) and all date from November 2013.

    There are three BIOS versions, F1 (from Oct 2012), F2 (from April 2013) and F3c (from Feb 2014)

    The BIOS in the machine currently is version 04.06.05 dating from May 2014. Apparently this is also known as BIOS is American Megatrends Inc. F3g UM 05/05/2014.

    Art
    Last edited by ArthurDent; 28 Jun 2020 at 04:46.
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  3. Posts : 9,738
    Windows 10 Home 64bit Version 21H2
       #53

    Your 5TB Toshiba drive could be a 4096 byte logical sector size and 4096 byte per sector physical sector size native 4Kn AF drive.

    Just for info, with that 5TB drive connected through USB Interface, open an elevated command prompt and run fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo <drive letter> as given in the Microsoft article on "AF Disk Comaptibility" and post a screenshot. Let us see whether it is 512e or native 4Kn. If logical sector size is reported as 4096 and Byte per Physical Sector displays "Not Supported" then the storage controller driver does not support the 4096/4096 per sector 4Kn . ( That is how I understand it)

    MegaHertz, I would believe was not very clear though not wrong totally... You must update the Storage Controller driver. You must check for the driver in Device Manager > Storage controllers. In modern current motherboards, if it is an intel chipset, it may getshow as as chipset driver. For example when I check Device Manager > Storage Controllers on my DELL Inspiron Desktop (AIO) it reads "Intel Chipset SATA/PCIe RST Premium Controller".

    If your motherboard is a Gigabyte motherboard, you may as well raise a query with Gigabyte.
    Last edited by jumanji; 28 Jun 2020 at 06:47.
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  4. Posts : 3,954
    Windows 7 HP 64 - Windows 10 Pro - Lubuntu
       #54

    The MB (GA-H61M-DS2 DVI) is quite old. From Gigabyte site I only found this two Win 10 drivers to the MB

    - https://download.gigabyte.com/FileLi...tel_me_w10.zip
    - https://download.gigabyte.com/FileLi..._intel_w10.zip
      My Computers


  5. Posts : 3,884
    Windows 10 Pro x64, Various Linux Builds, Networking, Storage, Cybersecurity Specialty.
       #55

    jumanji said:
    Your 5TB Toshiba drive could be a 4096 byte logical sector size and 4096 byte per sector physical sector size native 4Kn AF drive.
    Just for info, with that 5TB drive connected through USB Interface, open an elevated command prompt and run fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo <drive letter> as given in the Microsoft article on "AF Disk Comaptibility" and post a screenshot. Let us see whether it is 512e or native 4Kn. If logical sector size is reported as 4096 and Byte per Physical Sector displays "Not Supported" then the storage controller driver does not support the 4096/4096 per sector 4Kn . ( That is how I understand it).
    This is a good point. 4Kn must be verified. However, Isn't that in the specs for the drive? I don't see it listed.
    MIcrosoft does support 4Kn drives under W10.

    I think that the OP needs a concrete procedure to follow - too many permutations here.

    Toshiba - Internal Hard Drives - X300

    Also Toshiba Support might be faster and more helpful. Forum?

    Contact - Storage Solutions - EMEA Region

    Last edited by Compumind; 28 Jun 2020 at 07:25.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 290
    Windows 10 Pro (x64) 21H1 (OS Build 19043.1165)
    Thread Starter
       #56

    jumanji said:
    Your 5TB Toshiba drive could be a 4096 byte logical sector size and 4096 byte per sector physical sector size native 4Kn AF drive.

    Just for info, with that 5TB drive connected through USB Interface, open an elevated command prompt and run fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo <drive letter> as given in the Microsoft article on "AF Disk Comaptibility" and post a screenshot. Let us see whether it is 512e or native 4Kn. If logical sector size is reported as 4096 and Byte per Physical Sector displays "Not Supported" then the storage controller driver does not support the 4096/4096 per sector 4Kn . ( That is how I understand it)

    MegaHertz, I would believe was not very clear though not wrong totally... You must update the Storage Controller driver. You must check for the driver in Device Manager > Storage controllers. In modern current motherboards, if it is an intel chipset, it may getshow as as chipset driver. For example when I check Device Manager > Storage Controllers on my DELL Inspiron Desktop (AIO) it reads "Intel Chipset SATA/PCIe RST Premium Controller".

    If your motherboard is a Gigabyte motherboard, you may as well raise a query with Gigabyte.
    Hi Jumanji

    Here you go.

    5TB drive only showing as 561.53GB-ntfs-info.jpg

    Also found this info which may be helpful:
    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/win...ibility-update

    Megahertz said:
    The MB (GA-H61M-DS2 DVI) is quite old. From Gigabyte site I only found this two Win 10 drivers to the MB

    - https://download.gigabyte.com/FileLi...tel_me_w10.zip
    - https://download.gigabyte.com/FileLi..._intel_w10.zip
    Hi Megahertz,

    As per post #52:

    The current Windows 10 installation (on the 240GB SSD) is working fine (currently writing this post on the Win 10 installation on the SSD).

    To try to get the 5TB HDD showing full capacity, I'd need to install this internally as the only HDD and boot off the Windows 7 CD/DVD into the Recovery Environment - yes?

    If, or when, the 5TB HDD is recognised as having 5TB of disk space, it wouldn't be bootable as I've tried re-partitioning & re-formatting the drive.

    I can't see how updating/re-installing the chipset driver would help.

    Can you explain please?

    Another question -

    The commands in your post (#16 this thread) are Windows commands for use in an elevated command prompt?

    Link: 5TB drive only showing as 561.53GB

    Wiping the drive under Linux

    As I understand Linux (and I'm a Linux 'noob') there are four commands that you can use to wipe a disk. What follows is mainly for my benefit as I acknowledge this is a Windows Forum and not a Linux Forum, however this information could be useful for others

    1) The dd command.

    To wipe a drive using the dd command, it’s important to know the drive letter and partition number. Make sure the drive is unmounted.

    To do that, use the unmount command. To use the dd command, open the command line and enter the following:

    sudo umount /dev/sdXY -l

    Note that X and Y represent your drive letter and partition, respectively. The process will make several passes over the drive, writing random zeros on top of your data.

    The command can overwrite the whole disk with zeros and is considerably faster than generating gigabytes of random data. It offers some operands that you can use to specify what kind of formatting you want. The syntax is:

    dd if=<source> of=<target> [Options]

    Only superuser can run this command because you can face a big data loss due to its improper usage.

    # dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda2 bs=512 count=1

    You can wipe a disk is done by writing new data over every single bit. To further complicate the recovering process we will write over the entire drive with random data.

    # dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sda2 bs=4096

    or

    sudo dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sdX bs=10M

    2) The shred command.

    The shred command is used to overwrite the specified files repeatedly and make it difficult for software to recover the data. The syntax is as below:

    shred [option] <target>

    The command also overwrites data in a file or a whole device with random bits, making it nearly impossible to recover. This command permanently erases the data. The command has some options which can be used to wipe a disk as:

    • -f changes permissions to allow writing if needed
    • -n (iterations=N) overwrites N times instead of the default (3)
    • -s (size=N) specifies the number of bytes to shred
    • -u truncates and removes files after overwriting
    • -v shows verbose information about the progress
    • -x does not round file sizes up to the next full block
    • -z adds a final overwrite with zeros to hide shredding
    • -u removes the file after overwriting


    So, to wipe the partition you can use:

    # shred -vfz -n 10 /dev/sda2

    It is possible to use shred with random data as below

    # shred -v --random-source=/dev/urandom -n10 /dev/sda2

    or

    sudo shred -vfz /dev/sdX (where X is your drive letter):

    3) The wipe command.

    The wipe command can be used to securely erase files from magnetic media. You can use the wipe command in order to wipe data on a disk. The wipe command has the command below:

    wipe [options] <target>

    The command is not present by default, you need to install it.

    My version of Linux is Mint (based on Debian) so I'd use:

    $ sudo apt-get install wipe

    Then use the wipe command to wipe a partition as follows:

    # wipe /dev/sda2

    4) The scrub command

    The scrub command can be used to overwrite data using patterns. The command is not available by default, you should need to install it on your Linux system. The syntax is:

    scrub [option] <target>

    To scrub hard disk, you can do as below

    Scrub uses some methods to operate on disks. You can use the dod method to wipe disks.

    # scrub -p dod /dev/sda5 -f

    Wiping a drive is dangerous because you can lose data permanently. You have to be sure to choose the right disk. Additionally, depending on how worried you are about someone taking the data, it can be difficult to ensure that some drives are truly non-recoverable.

    # scrub /dev/sda5

    Once wiped, the drive is ready to be formatted.

    To get GParted:

    sudo apt-get install gparted
    gksu gparted

    Once you have it, click “device,” then click “create partition.”

    By default, GParted will create a partition using all the unallocated space.

    Now, click the “apply” button to create the partition. Right-click the new partition and select “format.”

    Art
      My Computers


  7. Posts : 3,954
    Windows 7 HP 64 - Windows 10 Pro - Lubuntu
       #57

    Maybe the problem isn't the X300 drive but some bug in win 10. Seen many people complaining that they can't see correct parameters (size free space etc)
    Crystal disk info showed the drive as 5000.9G
    As you mentioned, the disk was working well under Win 7.
    The Chipset is the hardware that controls the SATA drives, so I would give the chipset drivers a try.
      My Computers


  8. Posts : 3,884
    Windows 10 Pro x64, Various Linux Builds, Networking, Storage, Cybersecurity Specialty.
       #58

    @ArthurDent -

    This Toshiba Support resource might be more helpful:

    Please contact our free Support Hotline (English and German language only) if you need more information.

    00800-THOTLINE (84685463)

    Here are their online resources for the X300 - drill down and look carefully - Diagnostic Tool - use that first.

    Downloads & Product Archive - Storage Solutions - EMEA Region


    Last edited by Compumind; 28 Jun 2020 at 07:40.
      My Computer


  9. TV2
    Posts : 2,009
    W10 Pro 20H2
       #59

    As Jumanji has been saying, the storage controller driver (Device Manager > IDE ATA/ATAPI Controllers) controls how the system and the OS interacts with disk drives. This is where the AHCI driver is.
    It is a simple process to update this driver if there is a newer one.
    If the driver is older it may have been written before there was any concept of Advanced Format hard disks (AF type).

    The chipset drivers are related and also important, as they instruct the OS how to use the installed components on the motherboard, including the storage controller, so that should be updated if available also.

    Hope that explains that part of it more clearly.
      My Computers


  10. Posts : 3,954
    Windows 7 HP 64 - Windows 10 Pro - Lubuntu
       #60

    Compumind said:
    @ArthurDent -

    This Toshiba Support resource might be more helpful:

    Please contact our free Support Hotline (English and German language only) if you need more information.

    00800-THOTLINE (84685463)

    Here are their online resources for the X300 - look carefully -

    Downloads & Product Archive - Storage Solutions - EMEA Region


    The diagnostic tool
      My Computers


 

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