Lenovo X1 very slow on 5 GHz wifi, normal on 2.5 GHz


  1. Posts : 87
    windows 10 Pro
       #1

    Lenovo X1 very slow on 5 GHz wifi, normal on 2.5 GHz


    Windows Pro 1909. I have a 7 Mbps internet connection to my local ISP. Not great, but pretty good in my rural area. No problem streaming Netflix or Amazon Prime on my TV or old laptop.

    I just discovered that my new X1 7th Gen (purchased 9/2019) is running at 1/5 speed wifi on the 5 GHz band compared to the 2.5 GHz band. I couldn't get Zoom video to work, which is how I discovered the problem.

    When I put my iPhone SE or a 5 year old Panasonic Toughbook laptop alongside my X1, they both get full speed on both wifi bands. Tested using Ookla on all three devices. So it is not my router.

    I keep up with all the system upgrades that Lenovo offers.

    Lenovo hardware diagnostics show no problem with my wifi, but those tests are just pass/fail. I can't find any other tests or settings that could apply. Tried posting on the Lenovo community forums but no reply as yet.

    Here is the info on my wireless:


    • Intel(R) Wireless-AC 9560 160MHz - Success
    • Device Information:

      • Display Name:Intel(R) Wireless-AC 9560 160MHz
      • Udi:IntelCorporation-Intel(R)Wireless-AC9560160MHz-DC:71:96:B8:7A:B8
      • Driver Version:21.50.1.1

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  2. Caledon Ken's Avatar
    Posts : 24,184
    Windows 10 Pro x64 Version 2004
       #2

    Think you should look at signal strength to laptop radio.

    You could try this old tool to visualize.

    inSSIDer 3.1.2.1 Download - TechSpot


    or you can get a report from your system.

    Netsh wlan show all | clip

    (produces report on wireless. Once output is produced the | clip portion of command places it on clipboard, ready to be pasted.)


    Open Notepad and Crtl + V to paste. Save and close text file. You can then open file or print and review.


    If you open the device properties in Device manager you could see an Advance Tab. Some tweaking here can help or HURT. Note what you change.
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  3. Posts : 87
    windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #3

    I have tried inSSIder and Acrylic Wifi Home.

    inSSIDer reports signal strength in db. Both wifi bands are around -60 db, with the 5G band wavering between 0 and 3 db lower (weaker) than 2.5 gb. If i remember my DBs, being 3 db lower means half the strength.
    inSSIDer shows a max rate of 1300 for 5 GHz and 216 for 2.5 GHz.
    I couldn't see any way to get a text log.
    Moving to 7' from my router, I got signals in the -30 db to - 40 db range. Midway from my usual workspace is an office around 20' from the router. There I got me around 50 db.

    With Acrylic, the results are in RSSI. That's relative to some TP-Link reference, I assume, since my router is a TP-link. There, my results are around -65 to -70. Again, 2.5 GHz hovers between +5 better and 0 difference. Max speed for 5 GHz is the same 1300 Mbps; for 2.5 GHz is shows as 450 GHz.

    At different times, I am sometimes seeing my actual internet download speed vary from 2 Mbps to 7 Mbps on 5 GHz. The 7 Mbps is the speed I am paying for. From the 2.5 band, it has varied from 4 Mbps to 7 Mbps.

    I am thinking about getting a new router. I have an AC 1750 TP-link which is only a few years old, but maybe I need something better or a mesh router.

    First, I want to repeat the internet speed tests via a wired Ethernet connection. That way I will see if some of the speed variations are due to my router's wifi or the hardware my ISP installed. My rural valley has a fiber optic main line, with little radios along it. They look like white plastic milk cartons. I have a small radio on a pole that gets a signal from the nearest main line radio.
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  4. JackHughs's Avatar
    Posts : 166
    Windows 10 Pro 1909
       #4

    Intel recommends that you check these properties for your wireless adapter in the Device Manager

    Default/recommended settings
    Property.........................................................................Value
    Channel Width for 5GHz..............................................Auto (AP determines width)
    Roaming Aggressiveness.............................................Medium
    Throughput Booster....................................................Disabled
    Transmit Power............................................................Highest
    802.11a/b/g Wireless Mode or Wireless Mode.........Dual Band 802.11a/b/g or 802.11a/b/g
    802.11n/ac Wireless Mode or HT Mode....................802.11ac or VHT Mode

    JackHugh
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 87
    windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #5

    Thanks, Jack. Those are identical to my settings.

    I'm now looking at a NETGEAR Orbi Pro - AC3000 Tri-band Router (SRK60). Price is pretty steep at $300 with one remote. But I've just started my search.

    One criterion for me is needing at least three Ethernet ports. I have some ethernet connections hardwired, including a monitoring system for my solar arrays that are 350' from my house.
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  6. JackHughs's Avatar
    Posts : 166
    Windows 10 Pro 1909
       #6

    Randysea said:
    Thanks, Jack. Those are identical to my settings.

    I'm now looking at a NETGEAR Orbi Pro - AC3000 Tri-band Router (SRK60). Price is pretty steep at $300 with one remote. But I've just started my search.

    One criterion for me is needing at least three Ethernet ports. I have some ethernet connections hardwired, including a monitoring system for my solar arrays that are 350' from my house.
    Hi,

    I'm frugal. These suggestions are from the King of Cheap

    If three devices are being served at 5GHz but only the Lenovo laptop is experiencing problems, a new router is not likely to help.

    If the Lenovo has full speed at 2.4 GHz, connect it at 2.4 GHz.

    If you need additional Ethernet ports, buy an inexpensive "gigabit switch" instead of a new router. I've been using an 8-port D-Link gigabit switch for close to two years with zero problems.

    Not elegant, just cheap.

    JackHughs
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 87
    windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #7

    I think that a signal strength of -65 to -70 db, with it varying by 10 db during the day, is inadequate for a stable Zoom connection.

    Your point about the gigabit switch, however, is well taken. I do have one already in my guest/TV room. It is hardwired via Ethernet to my router, probably 75' of ethernet away.

    With an internet download available of only 7 Mbps, I don't need a lot of speed. I do need a stable wifi connection. At that speed, I could have a wifi router with a single ethernet port hooked up to a switch.

    My biggest problem will be my cabin. I just measured the shortest distance that I could have from the house wifi router to the cabin would be 75'. Right now I have an adequate setup, with Cisco router in the cabin. I had to change the firmware to convert it to a WAP first. It was so long ago that I have no recollection of how I did it. So I don't know if it will work as a WAP with a new mesh router in the house, or if I'd need to buy an additional remote matching the new house router.

    I won't need full speed in the cabin. Guests who need that can just come over to the house. Just a decent connection for them to get email on their laptops will be adequate.
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  8. Caledon Ken's Avatar
    Posts : 24,184
    Windows 10 Pro x64 Version 2004
       #8

    Since cabin is likely on your power distribution what about a powerline extender to cabin.

    Think you've already determined, signal strength is to low for high speed 5Ghz.
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  9. Posts : 87
    windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #9

    Caledon Ken said:
    Since cabin is likely on your power distribution what about a powerline extender to cabin.
    Think you've already determined, signal strength is to low for high speed 5Ghz.
    Cabin has its own power and meter head from a different line than my house.

    Ironically, I have been trying since last year to get an electrician to run a single circuit from my house`s generator subpanel to the cabin for the fridge there. I have an automatic generator in my house. This circuit would have put the cabin fridge on generator backup for power outages during fire season here. It could have powered a powerline extender.

    Alas, electricians in the rural area where I live don't like to do small jobs.I had no success getting anyone to come out. They were all too busy with the building boom here. Now they have all stopped working construction, due to WA state governor's shutdown edict.
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