Hard Drive Dying? PLEASE HELP!

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  1. Posts : 38,545
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       #51

    Running repeat HD Tune tests on the drive is unnecessary.

    It may cause harm as it is using the drive before important files are backed up.

    The drive is a failed drive by Sea Tools short generic testing.

    The HD Tune tests are different from the Sea Tools short generic test.

    Whether a test of a read and or write error disappears or remains does not change the short generic failure.

    These surface errors (bad blocks) can be modified if they are soft.
    If they are mechanical they cannot be modified.

    Again the drive has failed the test that is similar to test used by computer manufacturers for warranty replacement.

    Once you have backed up important files you can immediately replace the drive.

    Alternatively you can continue to use the failed drive until the terminal event.
    The time duration of course is unknown.
    Whether there will be performance problems that are frequent or infrequent are also unknown.
    Performance problems include slow read, slow write, new data loss, unexpected shutdowns, slow boot, etc.
      My Computer

  2. idgat's Avatar
    Posts : 935
    Windows 10 Pro
       #52

    NiceAndShy said:
    I'm using the 3rd party app "Teracopy Pro" to copy the files off this damaged 2TB Seagate internal HDD to an external USB HDD.

    Earlier Bree mentioned that I can use Windows 10 Pro's inbuilt "Backup and Restore -- Create a system image" but will using this feature backup every file on my 2TB Seagate internal HDD or will it only backup the "Windows 10 System Files"

    I've been wanting to use "CHKDSK" but I was fearful that it may damage my 2TB Seagate internal HDD further...?

    What else can I do?

    EDIT:
    I forgot to mention that I've been thinking of using the official "SeaTools" app from Seagate and do another scan, but I'm worried about doing another scan and damaging the Seagate HDD further...
    OK, Teracopy one of the more reliable/reputable copy options

    Although Windows built-in backup programs do the job, some 3rd party software (Teracopy, Robabocopy Fast Copy, etc) do the job a lot faster.

    So far as an image goes, I wouldn't be going down that track. If a drive is failing, there's likely to be damaged/corrupted/repaired files on the drive ... not the sort of files worth the time saving and restoring back to a new drive.

    Once you get your data onto another storage, go for it with disk testing software ... the main objective is to backup your data.

    I don't want to add to your woes, but another aspect that might be worthwhile keeping in mind ... if the trouble persists with a new drive, you might have to consider computer hardware fault - sata cable, mobo sata port, etc (could explain the : works ok, doen't, works ok, doesn't phenomena). But only time will tell with a new drive.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 613
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #53

    Bree, your reply is much appreciated!

    Bree said:
    Is this drive the one that has your Windows system on it and that you boot from, or is Windows on another drive and this drive is just for data and/or games?
    Yes, this HDD has all of my Windows system on it that I boot from and also stores my data and a couple games. I don't have another internal HDD as yet as my buying options are limited in my area.

    You can make a system image of this drive with Backup & Restore (Windows 7), but the system image has to include the partition(s) from the drive that Windows is installed on. You cannot de-select those partitions, but you can optionally include any other partitions and drives (such as this one) in the system image. Macrium Reflect on the other hand would allow you to make an image of just this one drive.
    I'm confused now because I thought "Backup & Restore (Windows 7) was only for users that wanted to go back to Windows 7?
    That is not entirely surprising. All hard drives have a pool of unused sectors set aside, when a weak sector is detected one of the good sectors from the spare pool can be remapped to take its place. This is called sector reallocation, but the HDD will only do this when a sector is accessed and confirmed to be bad. Your scan of the entire drive drive probably triggered the detection and reallocation.
    Okay this is why I thought by deleting large files on the HDD I'd be giving my data some protection and buy me some time because the HDD would have more sectors to save files to and more sectors to write to? It looks like the first red bad block in HD Tune appears at around 61%.

    You can confirm if this is the case by looking at the S.M.A.R.T. data for the drive on HD Tune's Health tab. The '(05) Reallocated Sector Count' will tell you if, and how many sectors have been reallocated. One or two reallocated sectors may not necessarily mean the drive is dying but many more, particularly if the number increases the more you use the drive, is a sure indication that the drive needs replacing.
    The HDD would have attempted to recover data from the weak sector before reallocating, so at this stage you should not have lost any data. But it may only be a matter of time before it deteriorates further so back up all your files as soon as possible.
    I'm checking in HD Tune says for the information you asked now.

    EDIT:
    I just added italics to "some protection and buy me some time"

    Also, I thought that by deleting files it'd make backing up easier because I wouldn't have so much data to backup?


    - - - Updated - - -

    zbook said:
    Running repeat HD Tune tests on the drive is unnecessary.

    It may cause harm as it is using the drive before important files are backed up.

    The drive is a failed drive by Sea Tools short generic testing.

    The HD Tune tests are different from the Sea Tools short generic test.

    Whether a test of a read and or write error disappears or remains does not change the short generic failure.

    These surface errors (bad blocks) can be modified if they are soft.
    If they are mechanical they cannot be modified.

    Again the drive has failed the test that is similar to test used by computer manufacturers for warranty replacement.

    Once you have backed up important files you can immediately replace the drive.

    Alternatively you can continue to use the failed drive until the terminal event.
    The time duration of course is unknown.
    Whether there will be performance problems that are frequent or infrequent are also unknown.
    Performance problems include slow read, slow write, new data loss, unexpected shutdowns, slow boot, etc.
    Zbook, I appreciate your reply!

    I'm even more baffled from this new information:

    I just used Seagate's "SeaTools for Windows" to run a "Short Drive Self Test" and it only took about 1minute, but it says in green text "Short DST - Pass"

    This is very strange isn't it? How can the HDD repair itself if it's mechanically damaged?

    By the way, I haven't done any reboots of this PC.

    EDIT:
    When you say "terminal" Zbook, you mean when the HDD is completely dead right?
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 38,545
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       #54

    Run Sea Tools long generic overnight.

    Many drives fail before the end user has backed up files.
    The terminal event is when there are no longer any recovery options (even expensive professional drive recovery options fail).
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 613
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #55

    zbook said:
    Run Sea Tools long generic overnight.

    Many drives fail before the end user has backed up files.
    The terminal event is when there are no longer any recovery options (even expensive professional drive recovery options fail).
    Your post is really appreciated!

    I'm still in the middle of backing up my files to an external USB HDD, but I've got files all over the place so it's taking me a lot of time and patience to try to find everything that needs to be backed up...

    This is why I thought it'd be a good idea for me to delete large files I don't want to backup: Gives me extra time to backup files because the damaged block and it'll take less time for me copy all my data over since there will be overall data to copy to the USB HDD.

    I've got a 2nd USB HDD here that I can use to copy files over.

    Can someone please give me a step by step process to follow of the best way to back up? For example, what's the best way to backup my "Windows Settings" so I can easily copy them over to my new internal HDD when it arrives?

    Sorry if I'm being an annoyance but this is been on my mind day and night.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 38,545
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       #56

    There can be multiple methods to backup files.

    The method that I've used is to open two file explorer windows.
    The first is on the problematic drive displaying all of the Users folders.
    The second is the file explorer on the backup drive.
    The Users folders are then explored.
    Users folders with important contents > right click copy > paste into file explorer in the backup drive

    To restore on the new drive > copy users folder to users folder

    If wanted, this should allow you to create a new users name on the new drive.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 613
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #57

    idgat said:
    OK, Teracopy one of the more reliable/reputable copy options
    Although Windows built-in backup programs do the job, some 3rd party software (Teracopy, Robabocopy Fast Copy, etc) do the job a lot faster.
    So far as an image goes, I wouldn't be going down that track. If a drive is failing, there's likely to be damaged/corrupted/repaired files on the drive ... not the sort of files worth the time saving and restoring back to a new drive.
    Once you get your data onto another storage, go for it with disk testing software ... the main objective is to backup your data.
    I don't want to add to your woes, but another aspect that might be worthwhile keeping in mind ... if the trouble persists with a new drive, you might have to consider computer hardware fault - sata cable, mobo sata port, etc (could explain the : works ok, doen't, works ok, doesn't phenomena). But only time will tell with a new drive.
    idgat, your sage advice is appreciated!

    Just so it's clear in my mind you think it's best for me to:
    --1st: Backup data using FIRST
    --2nd: Then after my data is backed up THEN run a HDD scan using HDTune/Seagate SeaTools For Windows

    I never thought my motherboard/sata cable could be damaged... Is it possible for me to check this? I'll make sure to order a new SATA cable for my new HDD just in case.
    EDIT:

    Screenshot that was requested earlier of HDD Health:
    Image-HDTune-Health1 ImgBB

    If it matters, I'm also running the most recent version of Windows 10 Pro with anti-virus fully updated.
      My Computer

  8. idgat's Avatar
    Posts : 935
    Windows 10 Pro
       #58

    NiceAndShy said:
    Just so it's clear in my mind you think it's best for me to:
    --1st: Backup data using FIRST
    --2nd: Then after my data is backed up THEN run a HDD scan using HDTune/Seagate SeaTools For Windows

    I never thought my motherboard/sata cable could be damaged... Is it possible for me to check this?
    Yes to the first option.

    As far as the 2nd option, up to you. Personally, I wouldn't be wasting any more time. Troubleshooting is a great thing if you're successful, but in this case ..... This thread has gone on for 6 pages now and you're still no closer to solving the problem. Dump the disc.

    As far as the SATA cable, only test is a new one.
      My Computer

  9. Bree's Avatar
    Posts : 19,204
    10 Home x64 (20H2) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #59

    NiceAndShy said:
    Screenshot that was requested earlier of HDD Health:
    Image-HDTune-Health1 — ImgBB

    The screenshot shows a raw data value for '(05) Reallocated Sector Count' of 80. That is a strong warning sign of potential failure in the near future. I don't think there's any doubt now that the drive needs replacing ASAP.

    I thought "Backup & Restore (Windows 7) was only for users that wanted to go back to Windows 7?

    No, it is available to use in W10 and can make a system image which could be restored to a replacement drive. I mentioned it because in the past you have expressed a wish not to use 3rd party software if at all possible.

    I would however recommend using Macrium Reflect Free as it is far more reliable and versatile than the built-in Microsoft tool.
      My Computers


  10. Posts : 134
    Windows 10 Enterprise
       #60

    NiceAndShy, not wishing to make this more complicated than it already is but I have seen all the errors/faults shown in your HDTune screenshot caused by a failing SATA cable. With all the (many) hard drives that have passed through my hands over the years, only one was actually failing where as several SATA DATA cables have proven to be defective.

    Do any friends or family members have spare cables you could try?

    I'm thinking more in terms of speeding up your DATA recovery from this drive rather than saving the drive as it is a risk regardless.
      My Computers


 
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