Looking for PCIe to SATA 3 Add-in-card

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  1. Posts : 4,023
    Windows 10 Pro x64, Various Linux Builds, Networking, Storage, Cybersecurity Specialty.
       #11

    Hmm...

    Startech can give you some good guidance. I would speak with them.

    We make parts for IT & A/V professionals that connect, convert, extend, split & switch | StarTech.com

    1 800 265 1844

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  2. Posts : 67
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit and Windows 7 pro 64
    Thread Starter
       #12

    Compumind said:
    Hmm...
    Startech can give you some good guidance. I would speak with them.
    We make parts for IT & A/V professionals that connect, convert, extend, split & switch | StarTech.com
    1 800 265 1844
    Thanks! I'll check this out.
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  3. Posts : 4,439
    Win 11 Pro 22000.652
       #13

    tweakit said:
    (snip)

    As I mentioned, my existing system has an SSD on a SATA 2 port. I manage (not mine) an HP Pavilion X360 laptop that has a SATA 3 SSD. It's a few months old and has an i5 processor where my desktop rig has a Gen 1, i7 processor. To me, the laptop pulls up web pages, opens and closes apps, boots and shuts down all noticeably faster than my rig. I don't think there are any problems with my rig but the laptop is faster on those things I mentioned. Both computers benchmark with speeds appropriate for their SATA revisions. My thought was the delta in speed must be due to the SATA 2 vs SATA 3. Am I being fooled here? Could the difference be due to some other difference between the two systems such as the processor?
    I wish that I could say something definite here, but I can't.

    I keep 3 systems operational. The main desktop has an Intel 750 NVME PCI-E 4X AIC SSD. The secondary desktop has a Plextor M.2 PCI-E X2 SSD (not NVME) in a PCI-E slot adapter. The laptop has a Samsung SATA 2.5 inch SSD. The laptop boots the fastest of the three, although it has the slowest SSD.

    Best of luck.
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  4. Posts : 67
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit and Windows 7 pro 64
    Thread Starter
       #14

    bobkn said:
    I wish that I could say something definite here, but I can't.
    I keep 3 systems operational. The main desktop has an Intel 750 NVME PCI-E 4X AIC SSD. The secondary desktop has a Plextor M.2 PCI-E X2 SSD (not NVME) in a PCI-E slot adapter. The laptop has a Samsung SATA 2.5 inch SSD. The laptop boots the fastest of the three, although it has the slowest SSD.
    Best of luck.
    Good data point, thanks. How about when it comes to pulling up web pages, opening and closing applications; do you notice any differences with those that are relatable to relative speeds of the C: drives?
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  5. Posts : 4,439
    Win 11 Pro 22000.652
       #15

    tweakit said:
    Good data point, thanks. How about when it comes to pulling up web pages, opening and closing applications; do you notice any differences with those that are relatable to relative speeds of the C: drives?
    Not really.
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  6. Posts : 11,183
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #16

    Hi there
    as NavyLCDR says your best bet is to look at SAS controllers -- however these although of "Enterprise strength" are often quite pricey

    I suspect using these on current consumer grade MOBOS would be a bit like using an old VW beetle engine in a Ferrari.
    If you really need those sorts of speeds then your best bet is a new MOBO.

    Also as others have pointed out Windows is quite forgiving in moving to new MOBO -- I backed up a laptop (INTEL with INTEL graphics) via Macrium and restored to an AMD computer with AMD graphics.

    After a bit of fiddling around after ist boot to get new drivers (didn't need to search --I just went down the device manager and clicked against anything with "unknown device" and chose get from online and all was fine including activation.

    If Activation does fail though - you can still update for free via W7 / W8 / W8.1 methods (give the serial number) -- it's been nearly 4 years I think when that program was supposed to end --it's still working though,

    Otherwise activate by phone --Ms is reasonable on moving W10 to a new system -- this I think though only works on retail editions-- note this process is done by automated responses ("Beware the Killer Robots .... !"). so have pencil / paper together to enter a whole slew of digits that you will get in a popup screen in case you can't type quick enough or make an error.

    Cheers
    jimbo
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  7. Posts : 67
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit and Windows 7 pro 64
    Thread Starter
       #17

    jimbo45 said:
    as NavyLCDR says your best bet is to look at SAS controllers -- however these although of "Enterprise strength" are often quite pricey
    I suspect using these on current consumer grade MOBOS would be a bit like using an old VW beetle engine in a Ferrari.
    If you really need those sorts of speeds then your best bet is a new MOBO.
    Yes, while I've not ruled anything out, I am leaning towards a new mobo.
    jimbo45 said:
    Also as others have pointed out Windows is quite forgiving in moving to new MOBO -- I backed up a laptop (INTEL with INTEL graphics) via Macrium and restored to an AMD computer with AMD graphics.
    That means in effect you changed two things, both the mobo and your graphics card. What kind of license did you have? Digital, OEM, Retail?
    My license is Digital Entitlement. I upgraded for free from Win7 Pro OEM license. I'm still confused about the license issue. The link NavyLCDR provided in post #8 makes clear that I can change mobos with my Digital License but that link appears to suggest you can do this migration with any type of license. Maybe I'm missing something but that's what it says to me and I don't get why Microsoft is permitting changing mobos on anything less than a retail license. I wonder if its possible they don't technically permit it but they are just allowing it for now, like what they are doing with the free Win10 upgrade window that expired but really didn't yet??
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  8. Posts : 11,183
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #18

    tweakit said:
    Yes, while I've not ruled anything out, I am leaning towards a new mobo.

    That means in effect you changed two things, both the mobo and your graphics card. What kind of license did you have? Digital, OEM, Retail?
    My license is Digital Entitlement. I upgraded for free from Win7 Pro OEM license. I'm still confused about the license issue. The link NavyLCDR provided in post #8 makes clear that I can change mobos with my Digital License but that link appears to suggest you can do this migration with any type of license. Maybe I'm missing something but that's what it says to me and I don't get why Microsoft is permitting changing mobos on anything less than a retail license. I wonder if its possible they don't technically permit it but they are just allowing it for now, like what they are doing with the free Win10 upgrade window that expired but really didn't yet??
    Hi there
    just try it (make an image and restore). I did upgrade from W7 ultimate with one of the old Technet keys when that program was still alive - those keys still work.

    If it fails you haven't lost anything as you can still activate by phone.

    I suspect that Ms is not slapping down too hard on W10 upgrades since they can make a lot more money on Office/365 subscriptions, azur cloud computing etc etc -- Windows isn't their main money spinning thing at the moment but if Windows users pay for services then its worthwhile to be fairly lax over W10 upgrades.

    Cheers
    jimbo
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  9. Posts : 67
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit and Windows 7 pro 64
    Thread Starter
       #19

    jimbo45 said:
    Hi there
    just try it (make an image and restore). I did upgrade from W7 ultimate with one of the old Technet keys when that program was still alive - those keys still work.
    If it fails you haven't lost anything as you can still activate by phone.
    I suspect that Ms is not slapping down too hard on W10 upgrades since they can make a lot more money on Office/365 subscriptions, azur cloud computing etc etc -- Windows isn't their main money spinning thing at the moment but if Windows users pay for services then its worthwhile to be fairly lax over W10 upgrades...
    Thanks jimbo45 for this information.
    Aside from the licensing issue I'm asking myself what could go wrong. What I anticipate doing is a migration to a new mobo as follows: I would first make a C: drive image on the existing system which has a 9 year old traditional BIOS (no UEFI) and a SATA SSD. Then I would make the hardware change to a new mobo that uses UEFI and an NVME SSD for the C: drive. Then I would boot on the macrium recovery disk and restore the image to the NVME SSD on the new mobo. I've never had my hands on a UEFI or an NVME SSD. Are there any words of caution for this operation or any steps I've left out here? I'm not sure if migrating from BIOS to UEFI platform or SATA to NVME creates some kind of special case I need to be aware of or if its of no additional consequence? Comment on that if you can and thanks again.
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  10. Posts : 17,281
    Windows 11 Pro
       #20

    The easiest way to go from an old BIOS computer to a new UEFI computer would be to make an imagine of the old computer drive. Then do a clean install of Windows 10 to the new computer. Then boot the new computer from the Macrium Rescue flash drive and restore ONLY the C: drive partition from the old computer over the top of the existing C: drive partition on the new computer. Then run the Fix Windows Boot Problems from the restore menu in Macrium.
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