SSD Lifespan

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  1. Posts : 24
    W10
       #1

    SSD Lifespan


    Is it necessary to move the temporary folders of Windows 10 to a second HDD disk, having an SSD disk, to extend its life cycle, or is this unnecessary today?
    Because I have read that even subjecting the ssd to large gb of writings a day, it would take many years to degrade
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  2. Posts : 4,525
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit
       #2

    I have been using same 111GB SSD for almost 4 years i do use HDD to store my documents but all programs installed on SSD.
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  3. Posts : 920
    Windows 10 Pro
       #3

    The whole point of an SSD is increased speed for operations. If you offload temp files, scratch disks, page files etc to slower media, why bother with an SSD?
    The manufacturers are the best people to ask since they design the drives, and I've never seen any suggest offloading those sort of operations to traditional media, you could say well they wouldn't cause they want you to wear the drive out sooner, but that makes no sense, if a certain manufacturers drives wore out sooner you wouldn't buy them again, would you?
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  4. Posts : 7,257
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
       #4

    You wont use up the lifespan of modern SSDs in normal usage.

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  5. Posts : 2,487
    Windows 10 Home, 64-bit
       #5

    ppdemo said:
    Is it necessary to move the temporary folders of Windows 10 to a second HDD disk, having an SSD disk, to extend its life cycle, or is this unnecessary today?
    Because I have read that even subjecting the ssd to large gb of writings a day, it would take many years to degrade
    You can easily find out how many GB you write per month or year.

    Compare that to the TBW (terabytes written) specification for the warranty period.

    Example: my current data drive has a TBW of 400 and a warranty of 5 years. By actual measurement, I write about 3 TB per year. It is 6 months old and SMART says it still has 100% of its estimated life remaining. At the current write rate, I will write about 15 TB of the allowed 400 TBW to remain under warranty (4 percent).

    My current OS drive has a TBW of 80. It had a 3 year warranty that has expired. I write about 4 TB a year to it. SMART says it has 89% estimated remaining life.

    Your write volume may differ from mine, but it's highly unlikely you need to pamper the SSD at all. They are tools--take advantage of their best capabilities.
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  6. Posts : 1,871
    W10 pro x64 20H2 Build 19042.610
       #6

    My Crucial 256Gb SSD reports 92% life remaining and 32TB of data written to it (that's 32 Terabytes). Its been installed for perhaps 4 years now and is performing faultlessly. It gets plenty of use with Windows Insider builds being installed weekly.

    SSD Lifespan-annotation-2019-09-20-125706.jpg
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  7. Posts : 2,068
    Windows 10 Pro
       #7

    My oldest SSD is about 10 years old now without any problems. Took no special precautions to keep it running. It's an 80GB Intel X25-M G2.
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  8. Posts : 1,561
    Windows 10 Home 20H2 64-bit
       #8

    You need to look at the cell density and Terabytes Written (TBW) for endurance. Many modern SSDs today use triple level cell, or quad level cell with single level cell as cache, to write data on. The durability is better on SSDs with lower density, but also MUCH more expensive (SLC>MLC>TLC>QLC). For daily usage, any SSD will last for a very long time. TBW is only a concern if you're constantly writing data on it, and I mean constantly writing data. Even as the main drive for the OS, it won't cause a problem for you.
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  9. Posts : 1,249
    Windows 10 Pro
       #9

    It is possible to kill an SSD with writes but you have to really work at it. It is unlikely to happen under normal and even heavy usage. Most SSDs die for reasons unrelated to excessive writes. Or they are replaced because they are too small. Torture testing of SSDs is done by writing to the drive 24/7. It has to be done this way because under normal usage the drive would die of old age before writes became a factor. It is also interesting that manufacturer specifications of rated writes tend to be rather conservative. In testing many drives lasted much longer.

    Use an SSD as you would a conventional drive with no special considerations needed.
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  10. Posts : 24,644
    10 Home x64 (21H2) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #10

    LMiller7 said:
    It is possible to kill an SSD with writes but you have to really work at it.....
    This guy did

    I never thought this whole tech journalism gig would turn me into a mass murderer. Yet here I am, with the blood of six SSDs on my hands, and that’s not even the half of it....

    ...Technically, I’m also a torturer—or at least an enhanced interrogator. Instead of offering a quick and painless death, I slowly squeezed out every last drop of life with a relentless stream of writes far more demanding than anything the SSDs would face in a typical PC. To make matters worse, I exploited their suffering by chronicling the entire process online.

    Today, that story draws to a close with the final chapter in the SSD Endurance Experiment. The last two survivors met their doom on the road to 2.5PB, joining four fallen comrades who expired earlier. It’s time to honor the dead and reflect on what we’ve learned from all the carnage.
    The SSD Endurance Experiment: They're all dead - The Tech Report
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