Everything to Do and Not to do with an SSD drive


  1. Posts : 65
    10Pro/7Pro
       #1

    Everything to Do and Not to do with an SSD drive


    Hello

    With the forum members input we could compile some good information here to benefit all in regards to SSD drives.

    1) For example : Should I defragment ( Optimize ) my SSD ?

    Answer : No it can cause unnecessary wear which will reduce it's lifespan.

    Because of the efficient technology functions of an SSD a defrag to improve performance is not required.

    Also it is good idea to turn off Optimizer scheduler so Windows doesn't automatically Optimize.

    There is different ways to turn off scheduler , Task scheduler, Command prompt , but I found the following way to be easy.

    To turn off -

    Near start button type in search area 'Defragment' > left click on Defragment and Optimize Drives > In Optimize Drives window lower right click Change Settings button > Uncheck Run on a schedule ( recommended ) > click ok > close

    A few people , myself included would like to be familiar with SSD and benefit from the experience of members findings.

    Everyone's input is appreciated
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  2. f14tomcat's Avatar
    Posts : 47,303
    Triple boot - Win 10 Pro, Win 10 Pro Insider (2) - (and a sprinkling of VMs)
       #2

    Thanks for the idea. Be aware, Windows automatically senses and determines if a drive is an SSD or HDD, and will do a defrag on an HDD, and a trim operation on an SSD. So your statement is incorrect. Windows will not attempt a traditional defrag on an SSD.

    It is not beneficial to completely nullify the scheduled defrag (HDD) and trim (SSD). The system first does an analyze scan before determining if either is necessary. and will not wear out a drive with scheduled optimization of either. Scheduled defrag/trim is by default once per week, I believe.

    If anything, never trimming an SSD will lead to performance write issues and spare cell usage, and never defraging an HDD will lead to a noticeable performance drop. As the empty sectors become further and further apart, new data will become scattered (splattering) across a wide area of the platters, resulting in excessive head movement. Head movement is the "moving part" of an HDD, and it will likely go first.

    Hope that helps.
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  3. Posts : 65
    10Pro/7Pro
    Thread Starter
       #3

    f14tomcat said:
    It is not beneficial to completely nullify the scheduled defrag (HDD) and trim (SSD).
    My statement was a misconception of what I have read and was an example that needed clarifying. Thanks for your input!

    @f14tomcat if have SSD and turn off scheduled defrag, would turning that off also turn off trim ? I would want to leave trim working.



    Reserved for updated compiled list

    f14tomcat said:
    It is not beneficial to completely nullify the scheduled defrag (HDD) and trim (SSD).
    Last edited by asusG; 18 May 2019 at 20:34.
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  4. f14tomcat's Avatar
    Posts : 47,303
    Triple boot - Win 10 Pro, Win 10 Pro Insider (2) - (and a sprinkling of VMs)
       #4

    asusG said:
    My statement was a misconception of what I have read and was an example that needed clarifying. Thanks for your input!

    @f14tomcat if have SSD and turn off scheduled defrag, would turning that off also turn off trim ? I would want to leave trim working.



    Reserved for updated compiled list
    Trim is a function of the controller on the SSD hardware. The OS sends a TRIM command to the controller, which in turn, erases cells marked as not used that contain useless data. This is a fairly quick operation. Without an occasional TRIM to the SSD, every write to it that needs that cell has to first stop and erase it it before it can write to it. That can create a lag and bottleneck to I/O. There are complex rules concerning where and why the controller picks cells to write to, but over time, the empty cell pool gets used up, and many erase/writes are needed. The TRIM command to an SSD does the erase en mass to large blocks of cells at one time, independent of the OS....much faster.

    Anyway, turning off the scheduled Optimization does not disable the ability to TRIM an SSD, it just tells Windows "don't bother doing that". You can always do it manually, if you remember....that's the purpose of the schedule. Bottom line, leave the schedule intact and let Windows do it's thing.
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  5. CountMike's Avatar
    Posts : 16,571
    W10 Insider + Linux
       #5

    Things not to do:
    Don't use as target for skeet shooting, stick in a microwave, swat large bugs with it (mosquitoes are OK), boil in hot water, drop from Empire state building....
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  6. Posts : 65
    10Pro/7Pro
    Thread Starter
       #6

    f14tomcat said:
    Trim is a function of the controller on the SSD hardware. The OS sends a TRIM command to the controller, which in turn, erases cells marked as not used that contain useless data. This is a fairly quick operation. Without an occasional TRIM to the SSD, every write to it that needs that cell has to first stop and erase it it before it can write to it. That can create a lag and bottleneck to I/O. There are complex rules concerning where and why the controller picks cells to write to, but over time, the empty cell pool gets used up, and many erase/writes are needed. The TRIM command to an SSD does the erase en mass to large blocks of cells at one time, independent of the OS....much faster.

    Anyway, turning off the scheduled Optimization does not disable the ability to TRIM an SSD, it just tells Windows "don't bother doing that". You can always do it manually, if you remember....that's the purpose of the schedule. Bottom line, leave the schedule intact and let Windows do it's thing.
    Thank you for taking the time to explain in detail f14tomcat, wish I could add another rep to you, need to spread some rep around before giving to you again thanks.

    Thanks again f14tomcat for the help!

    On the other hand some members (very few) just post bla bla to increase their Post count pity...
    Last edited by asusG; 06 Jun 2019 at 11:50.
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