Using DBAN


  1. Posts : 524
    Windows 10 Pro 19042 x64
       #1

    Using DBAN


    Hello,Before running "DBAN" to wipe everything on both disks (old computer). Will the disks still be partitioned as they were, or have to repartition them.Answers will be appreciated.ThanksMotim
      My Computer

  2. Berton's Avatar
    Posts : 11,009
    Win10 Pro Versions 2004 and 2009/20H2, Win10 Pro IP_Dev, Win10 Home 1909
       #2

    All drives need at least 1 partition created before it can be formatted, so Yes, partitions would need to be recreated as desired. For simply storage a single would be needed but one can usually create up to 4 Primary partitions, then there's the Extended and Logical approaches. Multiple partitions are handy for storing different types of files but one can get carried away and have a nightmare of file management at times [been there done that].
      My Computers

  3. lx07's Avatar
    Posts : 5,479
    2004
       #3

    You could just use the Windows format utility and untick the "quick format" box. That will write zeros to the disk.

    There is no appreciable difference (doing it 2 or 10 or 100 times) unless you are planning to give your drives to the NSA and they for some reason decide to use an electron microscope to check each individual bit.

    The partition table (which is separate from the data on the disk) is stored in the first few logical tracks of the drive (and in the case of GPT duplicated at the end also). A quick format just overwrites that leaving the data as it was. You could (if you wanted) reapply the partition table and you would see all your data again. This is often how file recovery software works.

    With SSD it is more complicated and it is probably not possible to securely delete data although you can try secure erase for drive that (a) support it and (b) actually do it. I would not trust it unless your data is not interesting.

    To answer your question though, formatting the disk destroys the partition table(s) so you would either have to make a new one or not. Zeroing the disk does both. A purchaser (and I've bought second hand SSD) would reformat anyway.

    If your disk have interesting information on then it may be better to destroy them.
      My Computer


 

  Related Discussions
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 20:41.
Find Us




Windows 10 Forums