Windows 10: Painless Windows 10 Backup Solution? Solved

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  1. Posts : 375
    Windows 10 Home x64
       18 Dec 2016 #11

    riqrat said: View Post
    Thanks for elaborating. Now I get it!

    Is this the common way to restore, to first install the OS (ie Win 10) and then set the drive letters, install the backup software, restore the data?

    What if I want the system to be restored back to EXACTLY the way it was? What would be the solution for doing this that INCLUDES reinstalling the OS and the exact settings (registry, everything)?

    1. Oh no, my system doesn't boot, has BSOD, has electronic pneumonia!

    2. Stick in a CD, boot into CD, run SomethingMagical and viola! Computer back to exactly how it was before EVEN if I swapped out the faulty hard drive.

    Or would this NOT be the way to go because...what if the MB had to be changed out? That would mean different drivers, etc.

    As long as I've been using computers and working on them (since 1976), I'm still grappling with the 'backup' method that is BEST for persons (like myself) that cannot afford any down time of the system due to its use in home business.

    Thanks.
    As a user of computers for 40 years, and having a business that can't afford any downtime a paid for version would seem to be what you need. "Can't afford any downtime" doesn't lend itself to using free versions of anything, probably be best to clone your existing system every (insert time period here, hour, day, week) to another drive. Something happens, you swap the defective with the good and you're back in service.
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  2.    18 Dec 2016 #12

    CmmTch said: View Post
    As a user of computers for 40 years, and having a business that can't afford any downtime a paid for version would seem to be what you need. "Can't afford any downtime" doesn't lend itself to using free versions of anything, probably be best to clone your existing system every (insert time period here, hour, day, week) to another drive. Something happens, you swap the defective with the good and you're back in service.
    Absolutely not necessary to pay for the backup software. Macrium Reflect Free will do everything the OP needs it to do - and its Free.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  3. Posts : 375
    Windows 10 Home x64
       18 Dec 2016 #13

    I'm aware of Macrium being one of the preferred programs for this, I've changed to Macrium from using the embedded Windows backup and restore since moving to W10, fortunately I haven't needed it yet.

    The emphasis put on "I run a business and can't afford any downtime" indicates the need to have something reliable and immediate. Macrium can do that, but again, it's free, this is something that the OP indicates is critical. I'm not trusting free if it's as important as the OP says.
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  4.    18 Dec 2016 #14

    NavyLCDR said: View Post
    The answers to your questions depends largely upon which program you are using to make backups and what type of backup is created. So, let's go with Macrium Reflect Free.
    Okay. Now that's an awesome response!

    It would appear that this Macrium Reflect Free pretty much covers it all. I'm going to download/install it as it seems to cover what I need. I'm glad to know that I can restore everything back to what it was at backup time or just a single file, and that I can either boot a recovery disk or install OS and Macrium Reflect Free, run it and restore stuff. Nice.

    Thank you very much for taking the time to write such an extensive and clear answer.

    Cheers!
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    18 Dec 2016 #15

    riqrat said: View Post
    Thank you very much for taking the time to write such an extensive and clear answer.

    Cheers!
    No problem. You must also consider the location of your backup files, though.

    My laptop and desktop computers both have SSDs for the main operating drive and second HDDs permanently installed for data storage. The secondary HDDs have two partitons - one for data and the backup image file, and a second partition that is bootable which contains the standard Windows 10 installation files but the boot.wim file is replaced with one that contains Kyhi's Recovery Tools - which also has Macrium Reflect free available. If something messes up the Windows 10 on my SSD - mostly likely me playing around with it - I can select the boot option from UEFI to boot from the HDD in the computer instead of the SSD. I have the ability to re-install Windows clean onto the SSD, or restore the backup image. All without any external device required.

    I also have an external USB hard drive set up the same way. And for my final disaster fall back I have an image stored on a RAID 0 Network Attached Storage drive unit with two hard drives which mirror each other. The only thing I don't have, which you need for data you absolutely must have survive almost anything, is off site storage. If my house burns to the ground, then I have lost it all.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    18 Dec 2016 #16

    CmmTch said: View Post
    As a user of computers for 40 years, and having a business that can't afford any downtime a paid for version would seem to be what you need. "Can't afford any downtime" doesn't lend itself to using free versions of anything, probably be best to clone your existing system every (insert time period here, hour, day, week) to another drive. Something happens, you swap the defective with the good and you're back in service.
    Too late. I already purchased. Guess like minds... Thanks.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  7.    18 Dec 2016 #17

    I'm curious, @CmmTch.... did you pay for Windows 10 because of the unreliability of the free version?
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  8. Posts : 375
    Windows 10 Home x64
       18 Dec 2016 #18

    NavyLCDR said: View Post
    I'm curious, @CmmTch.... did you pay for Windows 10 because of the unreliability of the free version?
    No I didn't pay for, I use the free version, but I don't use it to run a business that can't afford any downtime.

    My comment didn't indicate "unreliability" of a free version, it's more of a "you get what you pay for"

    I see it frequently in my line of work, people buy a residential service for business use strictly because they don't want to pay for business level service. Their service goes down, and since they aren't paying for business level QOS, they're paying for the less expensive residential rate and the restoral time for residential is not on par with a business QOS.
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  9.    18 Dec 2016 #19

    NavyLCDR said: View Post
    No problem. You must also consider the location of your backup files, though.

    My laptop and desktop computers both have SSDs for the main operating drive and second HDDs permanently installed for data storage. The secondary HDDs have two partitons - one for data and the backup image file, and a second partition that is bootable which contains the standard Windows 10 installation files but the boot.wim file is replaced with one that contains Kyhi's Recovery Tools - which also has Macrium Reflect free available. If something messes up the Windows 10 on my SSD - mostly likely me playing around with it - I can select the boot option from UEFI to boot from the HDD in the computer instead of the SSD. I have the ability to re-install Windows clean onto the SSD, or restore the backup image. All without any external device required.

    I also have an external USB hard drive set up the same way. And for my final disaster fall back I have an image stored on a RAID 0 Network Attached Storage drive unit with two hard drives which mirror each other. The only thing I don't have, which you need for data you absolutely must have survive almost anything, is off site storage. If my house burns to the ground, then I have lost it all.
    Now that you brought it up...

    Maybe you can help me decide on an approach?

    My system storage looks like this:

    Main (C: - 150g) and Secondary (D: 350g) are partitions on a SSD (Samsung SSD 850 EVO 500gb uses Samsung Magician)

    Storage (E is a 250g HD

    Backups (F is a 1tb HD

    I wanted the SSD to allow me super fast bootups. It has been awesome. I made the partition size just 150g because I figured it should be just for the Windows 10 OS (for the most part). The rest of the SSD holds copies of all my downloaded software and other files that really is long-term storage with limited write/read activity. I decided this because of something I read a few years ago that constant write/deletion on SSDs eventually renders the drive useless. Don't know it that really applies today or with my particular SSD, but that's the thinking behind my decision.

    The E: drive sees a lot of activity, and I tend to INSTALL applications on this drive rather than C: for the reasons listed above. So as long as an application gives me a choice where to install (some go right to C: which I don't like), I choose E:.

    And F: is a drive I installed to hold IMAGES for backups. I figured 1tb should be enough space to make images of C, D and E. I wanted an installed drive for this for quick restores. I also have USB2 and USB3 external storages of 500g drives.


    So question:

    1. Any thoughts on what I've done above?

    2. Should I install Macrium on my C: (SSD) or on my E: like I do other apps (or does it matter)?

    Thanks.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  10.    18 Dec 2016 #20

    If it were my computer (and the way I run my computers), I would move the D: drive partition to the entire 250 GB HDD. Then I would extend the C: drive partition to fill the entire SSD and just install all the normally used programs to it. The life of the SSD is based upon erase and write cycles, not read only cycles. Most files associated with programs are only read when the program loads and not written over unless they are upgraded. The purpose of the SSD is to improve speed. Installing every program that you can onto a mechanical HDD largely negates that whole purpose.

    And if you look at the actual number of erase and write cycles that is required to "wear out" an SSD - and distrubite those erase and write cycles over every bit storage location on the drive, you will discover that the affect of write cycles on an SSD is grossly exaggerated:
    Better calculator:
    SsdReady: Measure solid-state drive life | SSD life time and measurement tool
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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