Restore Backup Image from one computer to another

Page 1 of 9 123 ... LastLast

  1. Posts : 81
    windows 10
       #1

    Restore Backup Image from one computer to another


    I have been running Windows 10 1519 (OS build 10586.679) on a Dell laptop for many years -- it is customized exactly to my needs and I don't want to have anything to do with any other versions of Windows.

    I need to get a new laptop and it would be very tedious to install that early version of W10 with apps and customize it.
    It would be much easier if I could restore a backup image of the current system to the new system.

    One issue would be drivers, but my guess is there may be others.

    Is this feasible and if so, how? Are there any tools that do it? I seem to recall that Macrium had some utility that they say could do it -- anybody familiar with it?

    Any advice/help is appreciated.

    Thanx.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 43,245
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #2

    Cloning drives is widely documented.

    And of course, disk imaging and restoring disk images to a disk is easy.

    Programs like Macrium Reflect, Aomei Backupper, Easeus...

    As you are so determined to stay with a given configuration and build, but don't use cloning or disk imaging already, I'm wondering what backup arrangements you have e.g. should your system disk fail?

    As to the problems you might face:
    If your existing installation is UEFI/GPT, then relatively easy.
    If your existing installation is legacy BIOS/MBR, then extra somewhat tricky steps are needed.

    Whilst Windows is good at reconfiguring drivers, there is a problem you will wish to consider. As you have Windows Update disabled in some way, driver updates would not be delivered in the normal way.

    It is likely that a newly purchased PC will come with Win 11. Your transferred O/S would be activated with that license.

    If you have Pro now, for example, but the purchased PC has a Home license, there's another step there.

    Just taking another viewpoint, transferring programs, accounts and settings etc from one PC to another can be accomplished (I have done it) with programs such as Laplink PCMover and Easeus Todo PCTrans, using e.g. a disk image of your original system partition as source. Single use license. That takes the pain away, leaving a little tidying up to do reinstalling jut a small %ge of programs or reapplying their license.

    And where there is sufficient basic compatibility (e.g. both PCs are UEFI/GPT, 64 bits) then simply taking a system disk from one PC and installing it in another works in many cases. (However- huge caveat- don't put your one and only disk at risk like that!).

    Another issue arises if you are transferring from e.g. a HDD to Nvme SSD - your existing installation will lack a necessary driver. Plenty of cases in threads here of that sort, and of clones failing to boot at first. Feel free to search for those and read up.
      My Computers


  3. Posts : 81
    windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #3

    Thanx for replying.

    BIOS/MBR
    Assume I will download drivers from mfgr site.
    I suspect Home, how do I find out?


    Without tool:
    ----------------

    Sounds complicated, with chance to fail.
    Do you know of any complete/detailed stepwise instructions?

    With tool:
    ------------
    I have been using free Macrium Reflect for regular backups. They say they have a xfr utility, but I would have to buy both paid version and the utility and I am not sure that it takes care of all those steps. What do you think?

    Laplink PCMover and Easeus Todo PCTrans
    I assume they're not free either. Which is better?
    Do they take care of those steps -- is it all automated, or require manual intervention?
    Do they integrate drivers in their downloaded form?

    Any other thoughts/headsups?

    Thanx.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 4,637
    several
       #4

    Probably. Win10 is quite good at adjusting to new hardware.

    There are few programs that have "adjust to new hardware modules". The only one I can remember that will tell you which devices dont have drivers is Paragon so they can be integrated during the restore. In most cases those kind of things are not really necessary for win10/11

    try restoring an image and find out. There is a good chance it will boot up ok and if any bangs in device manager it will download mising drivers for you.

    if the new machine has a key in the firmware for a different edition, there are workarounds.

    If you are planning on using winpe media to do the restore, new intel (11th,12th,13th gen) oem machines often need irst drivers in winpe to be able to see the target disk.

    these are the instructions from hp it is the same steps for dell, acer and the others

    https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c06983517


    I suspect Home, how do I find out?
    type winver in the search box
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 43,245
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #5

    Assuming this is at all do-able with your constraint:

    Considering just one step:
    BIOS/MBR
    Assuming the target PC is UEFI only you would have to do this:
    Convert GPT Disk to MBR Disk in Windows 10
    - which itself is non-trivial.

    Cloning disks- readily done- plenty of options.

    Some things depend on what the new PC is... as I mentioned, you may find you lack the driver required for the new disk and hardware.

    Laplink PCMover and Easeus Todo PCTrans
    I assume they're not free either. Which is better?
    Do they take care of those steps -- is it all automated, or require manual intervention?
    Do they integrate drivers in their downloaded form?
    This route does NOT require you clone your disk. Therefore the BIOS/UEFI difference is irrelevant if you go this way.

    What these do is move your user acounts and everything else (you can select what is moved) from one working installation to another- normally a clean installed O/S. They deal with installed programs and accounts, and optionally user data.

    If you were to opt for this, the clean install should resolve driver issues.

    If you really wanted to keep your old build and clean install that, there is a major caveat- you would want to install your old build with no internet connection. That may leave you with driver issues.

    Note: if your modifications mean you have hacked system files, or made unusual registry changes, only cloning what you have now would carry those over.

    I suspect Home, how do I find out?
    Settings, About
    Restore Backup Image from one computer to another-1.jpg
      My Computers


  6. Posts : 81
    windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #6

    >Probably. Win10 is quite good at adjusting to new hardware.

    I assume you mean the Macrium utility.

    >try restoring an image and find out. There is a good chance it will boot up ok and if any bangs in device manager it will download missing drivers for you. If you are planning on using winpe media to do the restore, new intel oem machines often need irst drivers in winpe to be able to see the target disk.

    I don't have the new laptop yet, so I can't yet.
    Yes, likely winpe media. I am creating the media with Macrium utility so I dk if it can integrate drivers and it will accept them in the form in which they download.

    >if the new machine has a key in the firmware for a different edition, there are workarounds.

    You have not replied to the following:

    Laplink PCMover and Easeus Todo PCTrans
    I assume they're not free either. Which is better?
    Do they take care of those steps -- is it all automated, or require manual intervention?
    Do they work with Winpe?




    I'm afraid I dk what this means.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 8,139
    windows 10
       #7

    The new pc if win11 will be set to uefi,secure boot, tpm so it likley it wont boot unless you change those settings
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 43,245
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #8

    >Probably. Win10 is quite good at adjusting to new hardware.

    I assume you mean the Macrium utility.
    No - Windows reconfigures drivers based on the hardware platform- as long as it has the necessary drivers.

    E.g. from Intel to AMD... one NIC to another and so on.

    Macrium Reflect is a backup and restore tool, unless you are referring to 'Restore to dissimilar hardware' when MR does nothing to provide drivers.
      My Computers


  9. Posts : 81
    windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #9

    Sounds like too many chances for problems.

    How about this:

    I install on the new system the old W10 without ANY customization and apps. I then have 2 options:

    1. restore the backup image from the old system with Macrium
    2. use Laplink/Easus utility to transfer.

    Pros/cons, part. in terms of minimal loss of customization such as registry and so on.

    - - - Updated - - -

    No, Macrium says they have a separate utility for transfer -- it's not the backup itself.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 31,914
    10 Home x64 (22H2) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #10

    sgeneris said:
    I have been running Windows 10 1519 (OS build 10586.679) on a Dell laptop for many years -- it is customized exactly to my needs and I don't want to have anything to do with any other versions of Windows.

    I need to get a new laptop and it would be very tedious to install that early version of W10 with apps and customize it.
    It would be much easier if I could restore a backup image of the current system to the new system.

    One issue would be drivers, but my guess is there may be others.

    Is this feasible and if so, how? Are there any tools that do it? I seem to recall that Macrium had some utility that they say could do it -- anybody familiar with it?
    The main 'other issue' is that the new machine will be a UEFI system requiring a GPT formatted disk. Legacy CSM support is no longer available in the newer UEFI machines, so you would not be able to boot from a legacy MBR image if you restored that.

    I had exactly the same issue when replacing my System One below with a newer UEFI laptop. This is how I did it.

    Bree said:
    You can actually restore a Macrium image of your Legacy bios/MBR system to a UEFI/GPT machine. My System One in my specs below is both my most frequently used and one of my oldest laptops. It's overdue for replacement, even running W10. It's certainly too long in the tooth to run W11....

    To migrate the installed W10 OS from the old Legacy/MBR machine to a new UEFI/GPT one, I first clean installed the same version of Windows 10 (20H2) on the new machine in UEFI/GPT mode. Then I restored just the C: partition from the Legacy/MBR system image to replace the C: partition created by the clean install. Finally I ran the Macrium recovery drive's 'fix Windows boot problems' tool to create the correct BCD entry.

    The end result was all my old system and installed apps running on a modern UEFI machine.
    A few rambling questions about UEFI - post #2

    Macrium Reflect does indeed have a ReDeploy tool in the paid version for restoring to dissimilar hardware, but I have never yet found it to be necessary. It certainly wasn't needed for the migration I described above. That was an image from an Intel based system transferred to an AMD based one. All the drivers would be different, but Windows 10 itself sorted out all the right drivers to use on the first boot up.
      My Computers


 

  Related Discussions
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

© Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:50.
Find Us




Windows 10 Forums