Restore Backup Image from one computer to another

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  1. Posts : 81
    windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #71

    Untrue- it's available in the free version. Or certainly always was.

    Ah, if so that's great -- problem solved. I will have to check with them to make sure.

    Regarding the method you described initially, I don't see why restoring the whole disk instead of just the C: partition would be a problem.

    <That's correct, but there's more than one way:
    Convert MBR Disk to GPT Disk in Windows 10>

    Yes, I checked those out. Minitool says only the paid version converts to GPT. I contacted AOMEI because I am not clear how their converter works: it's not like the Macrium boot fixer which is included on the recovery disk -- it has to be installed and run and it can't be done because after restore the disk is not bootable.

    <HOWEVER note the limitaiton on the number partitions on the source disk that applies to at least one method.>

    Is 3 partitions an issue? I'll have to check.

    <Bear in mind there are plenty of valid ways to disable Windows Update- which you can do having done everything offline.
    When ready, enable your internet connection for activation.
    Provided you don't manually check for updates and Windows Update is disabled, you can try to activate Windows.
    I don't personally know if disabling WU has anything to do with activation. I would hope not. >

    Actually, Wupdate should not be an issue.
    After the restore, I boot from the recovery CD, and after the boot fix, if the migration is OK the restored copy includes an application that blocks Wupdate and it should kick in (another reason to restore the whole disk).

    But the activation may till be an issue due to the original OEM license.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 43,245
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #72

    But the activation may till be an issue due to the original OEM license.
    No, on two grounds.
    a. Although strictly it was stated that OEM licences could not be transferred. in practice when upgrade to Win 10 these seem to be moved to the Retail channel.

    b. Unless you intervened in a very specific manner, as I said before, if you buy a PC with a Windows license, your installation will acquire that PC's activation.

    includes an application that blocks Wupdate and it should kick in (another reason to restore the whole disk).
    Not specifically a reason to restore the whole disk.

    You can install Windows or transfer it offline.
      My Computers


  3. Posts : 81
    windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #73

    <No, on two grounds.
    a. Although strictly it was stated that OEM licences could not be transferred. in practice when upgrade to Win 10 these seem to be moved to the Retail channel.
    b. Unless you intervened in a very specific manner, as I said before, if you buy a PC with a Windows license, your installation will acquire that PC's activation.>

    Ah, if so, then this issue is also eliminated. I can now finalize the procedure and post it for review.

    <Not specifically a reason to restore the whole disk.
    You can install Windows or transfer it offline. >

    Indeed. But the core reason, aside from saving me the hassle of partitioning and copying, is to ensure that customization is preserved 100%.

    - - - Updated - - -
    @dalchina,

    Here's what AOMEI replied:

    "If the new PC is only with UEFI boot, we advise you to create a bootable media on a working PC with Partition Assistant and then boot the new PC into WinPE to convert the drive to GPT. And, you might need to manually create a .efi partition on the drive so it is able to boot after conversion."

    The 1st step is
    Is the .efi partition the reserved partition? Doesn't the restore of the whole disk also restore the reserved partition?
    How can I create it "manually" while booted in winpe (and unable to reboot without that partition)?

    Is this what the Macrium 'fix boot tool' does -- creates the .efi partition? If so, note:
    * In the Macrium method, there is no conversion step -- only the restore and the boot fix -- creating the .efi.
    * AOMEI does the conversion, but leaves you to create the partition and it's not clear how.

    Waiting for them to answer.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 43,245
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #74

    There are numerous posts on tenforums where creating an EFI partition is described.

    All that's needed is to search tenforums for such.

    E.g.
    Moving / recreating EFI partition


    Is the .efi partition the reserved partition?
    Try asking Google
    What is an efi partition
      My Computers


  5. Posts : 81
    windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #75

    dalchina said:
    There are numerous posts on tenforums where creating an EFI partition is described.

    All that's needed is to search tenforums for such.

    E.g.
    Moving / recreating EFI partition



    Try asking Google
    What is an efi partition
    I did:

    "The EFI stands for Extensible Firmware Interface system partition is generally a partition in the data storage devices like hard disk drives or an SSD used by a computer system cohere to the UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface).

    When you boot your computer, the UEFI firmware loads the file stored on EFI or ESP (EFI System Partition) to start the currently installed operating system on your system and various system utilities. The ESP contains the boot loaders and kernel images, device driver files, and other utilities required to run before booting the OS.

    The EFI is a minimal partition of around 100 MB, which is formatted with FAT32. This is where all the applications needed for the startup of windows are stored. You can access the EFI system partition on windows by running the mountvol / s command."

    It seems to say it's a UEFI thing, but it looks the UEFI equivalent to the reserved partition in BIOS/MBR -- the Macrium fix boot tool converts the reserved partition to the .efi partition. IF so:
    * in the method you described initially Macrium does not do conversion (relies on the restore) and just creates the .efi.
    * AOMEI does conversion but leaves you to create the .efi manually -- not clear how;

    If AOMEI is free I gotta find out how to create the .efi manually.


    If AOMEI is free, then I have to find out how do I create the .efi manually.

    If this is the case and the AOMEI assistant
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 43,245
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #76

    If AOMEI is free, then I have to find out how do I create the .efi manually.
    See link in my previous post....
      My Computers


  7. Posts : 81
    windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #77

    dalchina said:
    See link in my previous post....
    Oops. sorry, I missed that.

    Looks like this provides the missing link: I create an install W10 1511 CD from the ISO I downloaded from MS and after the restore I exit the AOMEI winpe and ***boot from that OS install CD and use DISKPART to create the .efi.

    I need to read the rest of the instructions for creating the .efi -- but the guy there was REMOVING the one he had and ran into some problems and needed addl steps. I need to create a new one -- wonder if it'll work without.
    Last edited by sgeneris; 14 May 2023 at 14:30.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 43,245
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #78

    Post #2 is about CREATING one

    diskpart
    list disk
    select disk # Note: Select the disk where you want to add the EFI System partition.
    list partition
    select partition # Note: Select the Windows OS partition (# number) or your data partition.
    shrink desired=100
    create partition efi size=100

    etc

    You may need to make some adjustment for your situation.
      My Computers


  9. Posts : 81
    windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #79

    dalchina said:
    Post #2 is about CREATING one

    diskpart
    list disk
    select disk # Note: Select the disk where you want to add the EFI System partition.
    list partition
    select partition # Note: Select the Windows OS partition (# number) or your data partition.
    shrink desired=100
    create partition efi size=100

    etc

    You may need to make some adjustment for your situation.
    Sorry, dk what you mean by "post #2"? If I just create a new .efi, what happens to the reserved MBR one which got restored together with the whole source disk?

    OK, let's assume this resolves the .efi issue. It raises an interesting question:

    In your initial method, where only C: was restored, it looks like Macrium's 'fix boot problem' creates the .efi. AOMEI's PA first does a conversion to GPT then lets you create the .efi manually. If they both work, what does the conversion step do that Macrium does not do, yet they both work?
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 43,245
    Win 10 Pro (22H2) (2nd PC is 22H2)
       #80

    post #2 in the link we are currently discussing- I quoted an extract for you for additional clarity. You quoted it above:

    dalchina said:
    There are numerous posts on tenforums where creating an EFI partition is described.

    All that's needed is to search tenforums for such.

    E.g.
    Moving / recreating EFI partition
      My Computers


 

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