Unable to restore from a restore point

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  1. Posts : 45
    Windows 7
    Thread Starter
       #11

    spunk said:
    The drive is beginning to fail, it has a little bit of life left in it, but You are just avoiding the inevitable and it should be replaced as soon as you can.
    Rather then create a 2nd partition on your current Windows drive, Remove that HDD from the computer and attach it to a working computer via a USB Adapter with a power adapter. It should come up as a secondary drive on that computer. You then can drag and drop or copy and paste the C:\Users\UserName files to that computer or to a USB Flash or HDD. You cannot copy any apps or programs, those will have to be reinstalled on the new drive.
    Yes, I thought , too, that the HDD is nearing the end of its ..8 years honorable life . Actually, It could be even older because I had bought it 2nd hand from a PC recycling store.
    Anyway, I have already fixed the problem in a different way. It took me almost the entire day, but I fixed it. Not too bad for an average fellow like me, who is not an expert..
    First, I did an Acronis Drive IMg recovery on the 2nd partition, then I copied the Windows folder , the Program Files Folder, the Users folder from the defective Windows 10 partition to the new partition, using the XCopy command .
    This has been the hardest part, because I was not using the right xcopy syntax and it took me more than an hour to figure it out with the help of Web.
    When I finally hit the right CMD syntax, the whole xcopy command went in like a charm in a few minutes. Now I have a perfectly working Windows 10, with the CMD command working. I'll make a new updated Drive Image and a new restore point, in case I have problems again.
    It took only 10 minutes to to do the Acronis recovery. If I had an updated one, it would have spared me a lot of time . I will update the Drive Image and create a restore point.
    I think the problem I had was the failing drive..When I was finally able to run the chkdsk and scannow commands with the CMD, there were a few sectors that had to be fixed..
    Thanks for your help

    Ittiandro
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  2. spunk's Avatar
    Posts : 3,576
    Windows 11 Pro 64 Bit 21H2
       #12

    Forget about restore points, System Restore is usually useless. just keep an updated Acronis Image at all times and you will be golden.
    I would not trust that drive with the previous Bad Sectors "Fixing" them just means Windows moves the data on the bad sector to a good one nearby. There are only a few good sectors to spare. So, you should be making plans to replace the old drive with an SSD as the HDD is still on the way to failing probably sooner than later.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 45
    Windows 7
    Thread Starter
       #13

    spunk said:
    Forget about restore points, System Restore is usually useless. just keep an updated Acronis Image at all times and you will be golden.
    I would not trust that drive with the previous Bad Sectors "Fixing" them just means Windows moves the data on the bad sector to a good one nearby. There are only a few good sectors to spare. So, you should be making plans to replace the old drive with an SSD as the HDD is still on the way to failing probably sooner than later.
    Thanks Spunk

    I think you are right on both points: the restore points are not always reliable and my HDD should be replaced.
    I am considering buying a new internal HDD, but my computer is old ( 8 years+) and I don't know if the new technology HDD's fit ( or can be fitted with adaptors) an older computer, because the cables and cable connections are different.

    Thanks

    Ittiandro
      My Computer

  4. SIW2's Avatar
    Posts : 2,513
    trying to install win10
       #14

    but my computer is old ( 8 years+) and I don't know if the new technology HDD's fit ( or can be fitted with adaptors) an older computer, because the cables and cable connections are different.
    I am pretty sure you have sata connectors unless that machine is much more than 8yrs old..

    A sata ssd is the way to go.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 45
    Windows 7
    Thread Starter
       #15

    spunk said:
    The drive is beginning to fail, it has a little bit of life left in it, but You are just avoiding the inevitable and it should be replaced as soon as you can.
    Rather then create a 2nd partition on your current Windows drive, Remove that HDD from the computer and attach it to a working computer via a USB Adapter with a power adapter. It should come up as a secondary drive on that computer. You then can drag and drop or copy and paste the C:\Users\UserName files to that computer or to a USB Flash or HDD. You cannot copy any apps or programs, those will have to be reinstalled on the new drive.
    I am not too sure mine are SATA connectors. I'd like to send you a photo, but I don't see an attachment option.
    There are two cables connecting to the back of the HDD: a flat, approx. 1/4 " wide cable with a small connector ( the power input, I suppose) and then a wider , 1" flat connector with 5 wires ( 2 red, 2 black, 1 yellow ) feeding into it..
    I have looked up the sata hardware on the Internet, but they seem to be different much smaller, probably about 1/4 ".

    Ittiandro
      My Computer

  6. steve108's Avatar
    Posts : 19,418
    19041.1466 - 2004/20H1 Pro x64
       #16

    ittiandro said:
    I am not too sure mine are SATA connectors. I'd like to send you a photo, but I don't see an attachment option.
    There are two cables connecting to the back of the HDD: a flat, approx. 1/4 " wide cable with a small connector ( the power input, I suppose) and then a wider , 1" flat connector with 5 wires ( 2 red, 2 black, 1 yellow ) feeding into it..
    I have looked up the sata hardware on the Internet, but they seem to be different much smaller, probably about 1/4 ".

    Ittiandro
    https://www.tenforums.com/faq.php?fa...b3_attachments
      My Computer

  7. spunk's Avatar
    Posts : 3,576
    Windows 11 Pro 64 Bit 21H2
       #17

    There are two cables connecting to the back of the HDD: a flat, approx. 1/4 " wide cable with a small connector ( the power input, I suppose) and then a wider , 1" flat connector with 5 wires ( 2 red, 2 black, 1 yellow ) feeding into it..
    As stated, follow the link in Post #16 to attach a screenshot or photo.
    The Small connector is the Data cable if you follow it should connect to the motherboard, the wider flat connector with the colored wires is the Power Connector which should be coming from the Power Supply Unit. Attached is a picture of the cables plugged into a drive for reference.
    Being that this is an 8 year old or older HDD. This is a standard SATA Connection for a HDD/SSD, if it was 20 years or older it would be PATA/IDE.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Unable to restore from a restore point-184615677-56a6f9b85f9b58b7d0e5cb78-1-.jpg  
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 45
    Windows 7
    Thread Starter
       #18

    Thanks Spunk,
    Ok, I see now, the small cable is the data cable, the larger one is the power supply. I thought it was the opposite. Anyway so far so good, it looks pretty much what I have except that my large PS connector has 5 wires, not 4. Can these cables connect to a new technology SATA drive or there are adaptors, perhaps?
    I sending a photo of my cables.

    Thanks

    IttiandroUnable to restore from a restore point-img_0757.jpg
      My Computer


 

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