HELP!! Win10 System Disk Image Restoration Fail (0x80070057)


  1. Posts : 5
    Windows 10 Insider
       #1

    HELP!! Win10 System Disk Image Restoration Fail (0x80070057)


    Hi, everyone!

    It's been forever since I've been here, so please forgive my evidently-first-post call-for-help.

    I was in the process of migrating my system from a 500GB SSD to a 1TB SSD, and through that simply using the Windows in-built Disk Image Backup utility that was brought-over by Microsoft from Windows 7 (but deprecated) would be an easy way of migrating the disk volume to the new drive, and using Paragon's Partition Manager would be able to adjust the volume size; I've used this program previously to migrate from a 250GB to a 500GB drive in Windows 7 in a similar scenario with no problem...which, sadly, I trusted would work this time.

    I have downloaded at least a dozen copies & versions of "recovery" programs, and none of them have been able to see or gain access to the .VHDX files created on my external USB backup drive. You name it: Acronis, Macurium, EasUS, AOMEI, etc. If a guide on restoring from these backups is on the net, chances are I've read it (even the 3 that are in German - thanks, Chrome translate!). I've put the system to it's exact hardware config when the backups were made (Yes, I'm aware that Disk Imaging *is* hardware-aware)

    15 years of work, *safely* locked away. Projects & potential work *frozen*. What angers me the most is that I took precautions by making two Disk Images on different drives within 30min of each other. What's even worse is that I could have installed one of these programs and used THEIR archiving programs and not counted on Microsoft's capabilities.

    So, here's what I'm looking for; I'm looking for an absolute worked-for-me-repeatedly solution. I'm looking for a software package that will ingest the vhdx files and output to a new hard drive, or a process that will do the same. I don't relish the idea of needing to completely re-installing Windows 10 + all of the years of software that I've installed on this system since the Windows XP x64 & Vista days up to the last 6 months of a project I've been working on. I'm aware that I can re-install Windows and mount the vhdx file and then copy the files in the container over to a new drive, but that doesn't make things bootable, etc.

    This is a "Hail Mary" folks. I'm literally at the end of my rope.

    Thanks in advance!

    --ScottK
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 17,349
    Windows 11 Pro
       #2

    What happened to the original 500 GB SSD?
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 35,444
    Win 10 Pro (21H2) (2nd PC is 21H2)
       #3



    FWIW here's a program you might not have tried - I'd never heard of it:
    How to mount VHD and VHDX. Extract individual files from Drive Image and Hyper-V backups

    - and can Backup and Restore (Windows 7) in Win 10 not access these files?
      My Computers


  4. Posts : 5
    Windows 10 Insider
    Thread Starter
       #4

    No go on Win7 or Win8.

    I'll give the new program a shot and report back.

    Thanks!

    - - - Updated - - -

    NavyLCDR said:
    What happened to the original 500 GB SSD?
    (Please hold the name-calling....)

    Since I safely have the data inside the archive, I tried some test to the original 500GB which required me to simulate the needed re-install of Win10. I know the data is there, it's just that the path to get to it is the problem. There *is* a method to my particular madness.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 17,349
    Windows 11 Pro
       #5

    ScottK said:
    Since I safely have the data inside the archive
    Except that you do not know the data is safely inside the archive.

    Here is an example of how to access the vhd(x) file from a Windows command prompt. Change the file location, disk number, partition number, etc. to match what is on your actual system:

    Code:
    C:\WINDOWS\system32>diskpart
    
    Microsoft DiskPart version 10.0.19041.1
    
    Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation.
    On computer: JOHN-LAPTOP
    
    DISKPART> select vdisk file="D:\Temp1.vhdx"
    
    DiskPart successfully selected the virtual disk file.
    
    DISKPART> attach vdisk
    
      100 percent completed
    
    DiskPart successfully attached the virtual disk file.
    
    DISKPART> list disk
    
      Disk ###  Status         Size     Free     Dyn  Gpt
      --------  -------------  -------  -------  ---  ---
      Disk 0    Online          476 GB      0 B        *
      Disk 1    Online          476 GB      0 B        *
    * Disk 2    Online          128 GB  1024 KB        *
    
    DISKPART> select disk 2
    
    Disk 2 is now the selected disk.
    
    DISKPART> list part
    
      Partition ###  Type              Size     Offset
      -------------  ----------------  -------  -------
      Partition 1    System             100 MB  1024 KB
      Partition 2    Reserved            16 MB   101 MB
      Partition 3    Primary            127 GB   117 MB
      Partition 4    Recovery           505 MB   127 GB
    
    DISKPART> select part 3
    
    Partition 3 is now the selected partition.
    
    DISKPART> assign letter=t
    
    DiskPart successfully assigned the drive letter or mount point.
    
    DISKPART>
    I believe that after you attach the vdisk, and give the Windows partition a drive letter, you can even set the computer to dual boot into the vdisk itself. After the above commands you would continue with:

    Code:
    DISKPART> exit
    
    Leaving DiskPart...
    
    C:\WINDOWS\system32>bcdboot T:\Windows /d /addlast
    Boot files successfully created.
    
    C:\WINDOWS\system32>
    Never intentionally erase your source disk until you are sure your image is recoverable!
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 25,047
    10 Home x64 (21H2) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #6

    ScottK said:
    I have downloaded at least a dozen copies & versions of "recovery" programs, and none of them have been able to see or gain access to the .VHDX files created on my external USB backup drive....

    No, the only software that can restore a System Image created by the built in Windows system imaging is Microsoft's own recovery disk that it offered to create at the end of making the system image. You probably skipped making that as it asks for a CD drive.

    The only other alternative is a recovery drive usb which also has the ability to restore a Microsoft system image. In either case, it requires to be made (preferably) by the machine that was imaged. Failing that, it must be made with a machine running the same bits (32 or 64) as the machine that was imaged (including system files is not required).

    Create Recovery Drive in Windows 10

    Restoring an MS system image, even with the correct recovery drive, is very temperamental. I speak from experience, having used it regularly up to three years ago.

    It will easily fail to recognise the image if the recovery drive you use it too different from the version of W10 in the image. In particular, it must be the same bits (32/64) and you must boot the recovery drive in the same mode as the Windows that was installed on machine that was imaged (ie. Legacy bios/MBR or UEFI/GPT). The drive you are restoring to must also be the same layout as the drive in the image (MBR ot GPT).

    With all these potential pit-falls it's no wonder that MS deprecated it.

    Failing that it is possible to manually restore a Microsoft system image. See this post for a link to the (rather complicated) method.

    Finally i am able to restore my system image backup. And for anyone who is struggling to restore there system image backup created using windows inbuilt utility then i recommended you to use the method given on the top post on 5th page in the link give below....
    How to restore system image backup - post #26
      My Computers


  7. Posts : 5
    Windows 10 Insider
    Thread Starter
       #7

    Bree said:
    No, the only software that can restore a System Image created by the built in Windows system imaging is Microsoft's own recovery disk that it offered to create at the end of making the system image. You probably skipped making that as it asks for a CD drive.

    The only other alternative is a recovery drive usb which also has the ability to restore a Microsoft system image. In either case, it requires to be made (preferably) by the machine that was imaged. Failing that, it must be made with a machine running the same bits (32 or 64) as the machine that was imaged (including system files is not required).

    Create Recovery Drive in Windows 10

    Restoring an MS system image, even with the correct recovery drive, is very temperamental. I speak from experience, having used it regularly up to three years ago.

    It will easily fail to recognise the image if the recovery drive you use it too different from the version of W10 in the image. In particular, it must be the same bits (32/64) and you must boot the recovery drive in the same mode as the Windows that was installed on machine that was imaged (ie. Legacy bios/MBR or UEFI/GPT). The drive you are restoring to must also be the same layout as the drive in the image (MBR ot GPT).

    With all these potential pit-falls it's no wonder that MS deprecated it.

    Failing that it is possible to manually restore a Microsoft system image. See this post for a link to the (rather complicated) method.

    How to restore system image backup - post #26
    If I have not intimated that I had tried the recovery CD, please forgive me - I did in fact build the recovery CD and attempt multiple times to restore from it with no joy.

    I'm beginning to think that it's just going to be better to just re-install and mount the vhdx file, grab critical files and just start fresh again. Hours will be spent, but I don't see any other way.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 25,047
    10 Home x64 (21H2) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #8

    ScottK said:
    If I have not intimated that I had tried the recovery CD, please forgive me - I did in fact build the recovery CD and attempt multiple times to restore from it with no joy.

    I'm beginning to think that it's just going to be better to just re-install and mount the vhdx file, grab critical files and just start fresh again. Hours will be spent, but I don't see any other way.

    Well, first have a look at the manual method referred to in How to restore system image backup - post #26. It too may also take hours, but looks capable or restoring a working system.
      My Computers


  9. Posts : 5
    Windows 10 Insider
    Thread Starter
       #9

    Bree said:
    Well, first have a look at the manual method referred to in How to restore system image backup - post #26. It too may also take hours, but looks capable or restoring a working system.
    I saw that - It doesn't look too complicated. Both require a clean install, so the effort is the same.

    Thanks for the info on that!
      My Computer


 

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