Restore a backup from one laptop to another laptop

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  1. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #11

    If it's the same system.

    C: is normally where drivers and the registry live.
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  2. Posts : 16,159
    Win 10 Pro 64-bit v1909 - Build 18363 Custom ISO Install
       #12

    Bree said:
    I have seen it said that you can clean install Windows, then restore just the old C: partition from the backup.
    Interesting concept!
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  3. Posts : 103
    windows 10 20H2 Build 19042.928
    Thread Starter
       #13

    @OldNavyGuy: Yes, it will be the same system Win 10 Pro on disk C:. Yes, all drivers, registry, apps... on C:.
    The idea is to restore a backup image of desktop-BIOS disk C: to not yet purchased laptop-UEFI disk C:.

    @Bree: This is not my case, since the 2 harware are dissimilar and in addition one is BIOS and the other will be UEFI.
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  4. Posts : 17,369
    Windows 11 Pro
       #14

    coukou said:
    @OldNavyGuy: Yes, it will be the same system Win 10 Pro on disk C:. Yes, all drivers, registry, apps... on C:.
    The idea is to restore a backup image of desktop-BIOS disk C: to not yet purchased laptop-UEFI disk C:.

    @Bree: This is not my case, since the 2 harware are dissimilar and in addition one is BIOS and the other will be UEFI.
    You can deal with the BIOS v. UEFI issue in about 3 different ways.

    1. Most UEFI computers have a CSM mode setting in their UEFI (BIOS) settings. Disable secure boot, enable CSM mode, and it will boot like a legacy BIOS computer (MBR partitioned drive, active system partition, and the system partition can be NTFS.)

    2. Manually create a FAT32 EFI system partition, a Microsoft System Reserved Partition (MSR), and then restore your old C: drive partition to the rest of the drive leftover. Then use the bcdboot command to write the boot files to the EFI system partition.

    3. Do a clean install of Windows 10 to the new computer. Then restore only the C: drive partition right over the top of the new C: drive created by the clean install. You may then have to "fix Windows boot problems" with a repair utility or the bcdboot command.

    The other main issue moving Windows 10 to new hardware (other than activation) is if there is a difference in drive controller mode: IDE v. AHCI v. RAID.
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  5. Posts : 103
    windows 10 20H2 Build 19042.928
    Thread Starter
       #15

    NavyLCDR said:
    You can deal with the BIOS v. UEFI issue in about 3 different ways.
    1. Most UEFI computers have a CSM mode setting in their UEFI (BIOS) settings. Disable secure boot, enable CSM mode, and it will boot like a legacy BIOS computer (MBR partitioned drive, active system partition, and the system partition can be NTFS.)
    2. Manually create a FAT32 EFI system partition, a Microsoft System Reserved Partition (MSR), and then restore your old C: drive partition to the rest of the drive leftover. Then use the bcdboot command to write the boot files to the EFI system partition.
    3. Do a clean install of Windows 10 to the new computer. Then restore only the C: drive partition right over the top of the new C: drive created by the clean install. You may then have to "fix Windows boot problems" with a repair utility or the bcdboot command.
    The other main issue moving Windows 10 to new hardware (other than activation) is if there is a difference in drive controller mode: IDE v. AHCI v. RAID.
    Thank you for your exhaustive response
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  6. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #16

    coukou said:
    The idea is to restore a backup image of desktop-BIOS disk C: to not yet purchased laptop-UEFI disk C:.
    Which probably won't even boot because the hardware is different.

    Drivers and registry entries will not be correct for the new hardware.
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  7. Posts : 17,369
    Windows 11 Pro
       #17

    OldNavyGuy said:
    Which probably won't even boot because the hardware is different.

    Drivers and registry entries will not be correct for the new hardware.
    Windows 10 is very tolerant of being moved to new hardware. Many members here, including myself, have moved a Windows 10 installation even between AMD and Intel and it picks up the new hardware just fine. One example, my daughter's laptop screen went bad. It was still under warranty. I had upgraded her laptop to an SSD. So, I removed the SSD from her laptop and stuck her old HDD back in to send it back in for warranty repair. Took that SSD and installed it in a completely different make and model of laptop for her to use in the meantime. Windows 10 boots up for the first time, gives a message about installing new hardware for less than a minute, reboots right into Windows with all the new hardware loaded up with no issues. She gets her laptop back, reverse the process, Windows goes through the setting up new hardware routine again and takes right off. No issues.

    Many members here have had exactly the same experience. I've also demonstrated in my previous post exactly how I have moved Windows 10 from BIOS to UEFI and from UEFI to BIOS. It was Windows 7 that likely would not boot.
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  8. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #18

    I've seen it happen in Windows 10 restoring from a disk image.

    Swapping drives is not the same thing as restoring from a backup.

    If it works for the OP, then cool beans.

    I would have a Plan B in case it doesn't.
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  9. Posts : 17,369
    Windows 11 Pro
       #19

    Well, the whole purpose of making a backup image is to be able to restore it to the exact same condition it was in when the backup image was created. If done properly, restoring a backup image from computer a to computer b will have the exact same effect as physically moving the drive from computer a to computer b. But we'll just have to disagree on that.
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  10. Posts : 1,867
    Windows 10 Pro 2004 20H1
       #20

    On the same computer...restoring to the same drive, or a new drive.

    Whatever works for you.
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