Recovering SSD with bad blocks?

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  1. Samuria's Avatar
    Posts : 6,027
    windows 10
       #11

    You should note if you have taken a standard image and it has had booked and you restore it to a new drive it will write all the bad blocks to the new drive which will be permanent
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  2. Posts : 54
    Windows 10 64 Version 10.0.18363.628
    Thread Starter
       #12

    ignatzatsonic said:
    We can't see your pic, but a standard Win 10 installation can create as many as 5 partitions on the drive...C and 4 more.
    Hopefully this works:
    Recovering SSD with bad blocks?-macriumchoicesbootdrive.png

    What are 1, 2, 3, and 5 above?

    ignatzatsonic said:
    What drive did you order? I'd stay with a well known name brand---Crucial, Samsung, Western Digital, Intel, etc.

    Your current SSD is less than half full, so there may not be any reason to buy a larger one. Larger drives can have slightly better performance as well as a larger TBW rating, but I wouldn't let that be the deciding factor when purchasing. Think about capacity, price, basic performance numbers, warranty, and the relationship with the seller.
    I am awaiting a Samsung, 512 GB SSD.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Samuria said:
    You should note if you have taken a standard image and it has had booked and you restore it to a new drive it will write all the bad blocks to the new drive which will be permanent
    How do I prevent the copying of the bad blocks? What do you mean by booked?
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  3. ignatzatsonic's Avatar
    Posts : 2,393
    Windows 10 Home, 64-bit
       #13

    Those other partitions are all standard Win 10 stuff. Looks nearly identical to mine. They are very small. Windows may resize them over time or may even add a new partition---all part of the installation and Windows Update process. Just ignore them, but normally you WOULD include them in a Macrium image by putting a tick in each of those individual boxes under the partition. Your pic shows a tick only under the C partition.

    Good choice on the Samsung. What model? 970 is the most recent I think, with the 970 Evo Plus being the most recent iteration.

    By "has had booked" he may have meant "it has bad blocks"? Guessing.
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  4. Posts : 1,383
       #14

    Macrium Reflect cloning has two settings, among many others, which help: intelligent cloning (unused sectors not copied) and, as mentioned earlier, ignore bad sectors.
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  5. topgundcp's Avatar
    Posts : 2,760
    MintMate19x64 Win10Prox64
       #15

    Samuria said:
    You should note if you have taken a standard image and it has had booked and you restore it to a new drive it will write all the bad blocks to the new drive which will be permanent
    You are posting incorrect info. Cloning/Imaging/copying involve 2 operations: reading from and writing to. If a source disk has a bad block then the program cannot read it and the writing part to the destination disk will be skipped and error message will be logged. Any data stored in the block before it became bad will be lost.

    We can't see your pic, but a standard Win 10 installation can create as many as 5 partitions on the drive...C and 4 more
    Again. This is also incorrect. A normal fresh install of Windows 10 will only have:
    1. 4 partitions: Recovery ??? MB, 100MB, 16MB MSR and C drive if installed on GPT disk
    2. 2 partitions: System Reserved ??? MB and C drive if installed on MBR disk and the disk was left unallocated. If format before install, you might only get a single C drive.


    Microsoft keeps changing the allocated partition size for Recovery and System Reserved partition in later version due to increased size of WinRE.wim stored in these 2 partitions.

    Based on the screen shot above, the Recovery partition size is 450MB, that means this version of Windows was created with previous version and updated with the latest version. During update, the Recovery partition cannot be extented to house newer, larger version of WinRE.wim which is over 400MB in size+other files and folders, the update will create a larger Recovery partition at the end of the disk and the first Recovery partition is no longer used.

    The size of latest Windows version 1909 is:
    - 529 MB Recovery, 100MB EFI System, 16MB MSR and C drive
    - 579 MB System reserved and C drive.
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  6. Posts : 54
    Windows 10 64 Version 10.0.18363.628
    Thread Starter
       #16

    topgundcp said:
    Running Macrium in WinPE environment (from KHYI's EinPESE) will not give you the option to skip the bad blocks. You'd need to install Macrium and run it online. Click on Other Tasks->edit defaults->Advanced ...Put a tick mark on ignore bad sectors.... then do a backup. This will save all your Data on the SSD. However, until you replace the SSD, restore the image, you will have to run Windows setup again to repair all the missing files.
    I finally understand this. Took a while. Earlier I had thought I would just install the latest version of Macrium Reflect with in the WinPE environment and I would be able to skip the bad blocks but as I found out that the Other Tasks were still limited:
    Recovering SSD with bad blocks?-macriumothertasks.png

    But when I installed Macrium on my Laptop then all the other choices in Other Tasks now appear:
    Recovering SSD with bad blocks?-macriumothertasksonwindows10.png

    Now, I understand I will have to properly image this from my Laptop. (Iíve got an external drive enclosure coming too.)

    However, until you replace the SSD, restore the image, you will have to run Windows setup again to repair all the missing files.
    Assuming I get the image restored properly, where do I run Windows setup from?

    Thanks much,
    Jeff
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  7. topgundcp's Avatar
    Posts : 2,760
    MintMate19x64 Win10Prox64
       #17

    Assuming I get the image restored properly, where do I run Windows setup from?
    Watch the video:
    Repair Install Windows 10 with an In-place Upgrade
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  8. Compumind's Avatar
    Posts : 2,715
    Windows 10 Pro x64, Various Linux Builds, Networking, Storage, Cybersecurity Specialty.
       #18

    @JeffFinnan -

    Have a couple of ideas -

    How old is the drive?

    1) Prune down the "bad" SSD so there is at least 5 GB of free space on the entire drive. Keep in mind that there are sub-partitions.
    2) Run Defragment and Optimize Drives - twice. See if there are any errors.
    3) If not, create another backup with Macrium and verify.

    Post back and advise, thanks.

    P.S. Get your intact data off while you can. If you are getting a new drive, you will need a clean install.
    Don't even think of cloning the old to the new. That is for verified "clean" filesystems.

    Keep this in mind for the future -

    How to clone a disk with Macrium Reflect 7.x

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  9. Posts : 54
    Windows 10 64 Version 10.0.18363.628
    Thread Starter
       #19

    topgundcp said:
    Got new SSD. Copied the image from old SSD using intelligent sector copy while ignoring bad blocks. Just to be sure, I even ran HT Tune to make sure the bad blocks were not copied. All okay.

    I have gone through the Repair tutorial several times. It seems like all of the examples are for a working system of which mine is not. I have set up a disc with the Media Installation Tool. There are no real upgrade options. I tried to install Windows from the media installation and trying the upgrade option. However, it says the upgrade option isn't available if you start your computer using the installation media.

    If I try the repair option on boot of the Media Installation, it cannot repair just as was the case with the corrupted SSD.

    What a drag.

    Jeff

    - - - Updated - - -

    I did do little more checking around. I saw there was information here about DISM and in particular found this: Use DISM to Repair Windows 10 Image

    For the heck of it, I tried it out on the healthy SSD that will not boot into Windows by booting with the media disk and following the above Use DISM to Repair Windows 10 Image.
    Recovering SSD with bad blocks?-2020-01-28-07.32.53-1.jpg

    Then I did a /CheckHealth
    Recovering SSD with bad blocks?-2020-01-28-08.30.02-1.jpg

    I was surprised to see No component store corruption detected.
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  10. topgundcp's Avatar
    Posts : 2,760
    MintMate19x64 Win10Prox64
       #20
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