Can't boot from newly cloned SSD drive


  1. Posts : 7
    Windows
       #1

    Can't boot from newly cloned SSD drive


    Hello, I'm attempting to upgrade my Windows 10 Home 64 bit PC from an HDD to an SSD, both 1TB in size. My goal is to have my SSD as my main boot drive and my HDD as a storage drive for my exceptionally large media files. I've already cloned my original hard drive using Macrium Reflect and currently trying to figure out how to boot from my SSD, but unfortunately upon selecting my new SSD from the BIOS startup menu my computer remains stuck on a black screen with a flashing white cursor in the top left.

    Here is a screenshot of both my drives in Macrium Reflect post-cloning
    Can't boot from newly cloned SSD drive-macrium-reflect-screenshot.png

    As you can see I'm in dire need of freeing up space in my original hard drive (I've already cleared all my caches, trust me it's all media files ). I also switched my new SSD drive partition structure to GPT from MBR after cloning using AOMEI Partition Assistant. I don't know if this had any affect on my current problem but it's the only significant change I made after the cloning process.

    Here is a screenshot of my Disk Management post-cloning
    Can't boot from newly cloned SSD drive-disk-management-screenshot.png

    The original HDD is my C: drive and the SSD is D:

    I should also note I attempted to use user SIW2's helpful program I found in this similar thread Cloned drive will not boot
    I selected "D" under "FIX OS DRIVE LETTER" and under "AUTO BOOT REPAIR" I selected "C" as the active partition and "D" as the windows partition, but unfortunately I had the same results upon restarting my computer.
      My Computer

  2. ignatzatsonic's Avatar
    Posts : 1,342
    Windows 10 Home, 64-bit
       #2
      My Computer

  3. SIW2's Avatar
    Posts : 1,119
    trying to install win10
       #3

    Are you sure you converted it to gpt? Doesn't look like it from your screenshot.
      My Computer

  4. SIW2's Avatar
    Posts : 1,119
    trying to install win10
       #4

    If you want to boot under bios

    convert the disk to mbr ( If it isn't already),
    mark the 350mb system reserved partition active,
    give the system reserved partition a letter, e.g. Z,
    then at command prompt, type

    bcdboot D:\windows /s Z: /f ALL
    Last edited by SIW2; 16 Feb 2020 at 09:15.
      My Computer

  5. topgundcp's Avatar
    Posts : 2,616
    MintMate19x64 Win10Prox64
       #5

    Yes, I can see you've already converted your SSD sandisk (disk 1) to GPT. Using AOMEI Partition Assistant to convert your SSD normally done on data disk, not on your Windows OS disk since the partition layout for booting on Windows OS is different between MBR and GPT disks.
    To fix this problem:
    Open admin command prompt and type:

    diskpart
    select disk 1
    select par 1
    del par override
    create partition EFI size=100
    format quick fs=FAT32
    assign letter=Z
    exit


    Next, rebuild BCD, type:
    bcdboot D:\Windows /s Z: /f UEFI
    mountvol Z: /D


    Next, access your BIOS, change boot priority for the SSD and set the boot mode to UEFI or In some BIOS, disable CSM.

    then reboot.

    NOTE: To avoid typing error, just copy and paste the commands to the Admin command prompt windows.
      My Computer

  6. NavyLCDR's Avatar
    Posts : 13,209
    Windows 10 Pro
       #6

    @topgundcp nailed it. The problem is that the SSD is GPT partitioned with an NTFS system partition. On most computers that will not boot at all in any mode because legacy BIOS (CSM) cannot boot from a GPT drive and most computers cannot boot in UEFI mode from an NTFS partition.

    We are assuming that your computer is able to boot in UEFI mode. If it isn't able to boot in UEFI mode, then you need to leave the SSD as MBR, and mark the system partition as active.
      My Computer



  7. Posts : 7
    Windows
    Thread Starter
       #7

    I apologize for my late response. Shorty after posting this thread I attempted to fix the problem on my own and ended up catastrophically corrupting the boot partition on my original HDD using a mistyped "bcdedit" command (in an attempt to copy the boot partition files from my original to my source disk). I ended up spending $100 on an external drive enclosure for my HDD and a program called PCMover to recover my files, applications, and configuration settings from my original HDD. The PCMover transfer seems to have finally successfully cloned my original HDD to my SSD.

    I had an epiphany after I already messed up my HDD that the reason my SSD didn't boot after the Macrium Reflect clone is because of that simple MBR to GPT conversion I decided to do, not knowing my computer apparently lacks UEFI. Coming back to this thread and reading the replies I'm almost certain now that that was the reason. A simple mistake that cost me 100 bucks, but I greatly appreciate everyone's help here.
      My Computer

  8. DonMurray's Avatar
    Posts : 160
    os build 17143.950
       #8

    So in GPT the 100meg partition needs to be fat32 not NTFS


    So in GPT the 100meg partition needs to be fat32 not NTFS ? So we need to manually create that partition on a GPT drive. So the partition table exists on a fat32 partition ?

    diskpart
    select disk 1
    select par 1
    del par override
    create partition EFI size=100
    format quick fs=FAT32
    assign letter=Z
    exit

    Next, rebuild BCD, type:
    bcdboot D:\Windows /s Z: /f UEFI
    mountvol Z: /D

    so we are calling a command bcdboot from the windows directory and we are applying it to the Z: drive bcd boot is like format /s it puts stuff there on this partition that lets it boot. ? But does z contain the partition table or is z just for the boot ?
      My Computer

  9. NavyLCDR's Avatar
    Posts : 13,209
    Windows 10 Pro
       #9

    DonMurray said:
    so we are calling a command bcdboot from the windows directory and we are applying it to the Z: drive bcd boot is like format /s it puts stuff there on this partition that lets it boot. ? But does z contain the partition table or is z just for the boot ? [/B][/B]
    All that is required for UEFI booting is for there to be a partition (and most computers require that partition to be FAT32) that contains a specific file structure and files. The bcdboot command creates those specific files. A partition (such as Z drive in this case) cannot contain the partition table. The partition table is located on a specific location on the hard drive, I believe track 0. Having the partition table located in a partition makes no sense, because the partition table is what defines the boundaries of the partitions on the disk. The partition assigned with the letter Z: only contains the files and folders that UEFI can read and boot the computer from.
      My Computer


 

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