testing Macrium Reflect image restore completely

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

  1. Posts : 13,536
    Windows10
       #11

    A good way to test an image is to restore it in a virtual machine. Even better is to use Macrium ViBoot if you have Hyper-V.

    Another good way is to restore image in a virtual hard drive.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 22
    Windows 10 Pro 20H2 19042.804
    Thread Starter
       #12

    Bree said:
    In Home you could always use VMWare, and Macrium's viBoot may one day be extended to work with it, apparently...

    New in Macrium Reflect 7.1 - KnowledgeBase v7.2 - Macrium Reflect Knowledgebase

    In the mean time, you could create Macrium rescue media as an ISO, boot a VMWare VM from it and use it to restore a Macrium image to the VM.
    Thanks for the tip! I've got options to consider. One thing about a VM is that I feel as though it's a simulation of what would happen and still not really the same as doing it for real ... the next best thing probably.

    Steve C said:
    Every time I've had to recover from a Reflect backup it has worked fine. I have high confidence in the software so I just mount the backup image from time to time to check all is OK. viBoot can be used for a more thorough check.
    Anecdotally, and considering the popularity of Reflect on this forum, I'm feeling pretty good about it. Although, I feel better experiencing the real restore process while everything is working and I have full access to resources. I'll save a few notes with my MR rescue USB for if/when things really go bad. That said, I doubt I would buy a drive to do this test, but since I've got an extra already ...

    Bree said:
    But @grusmarco should be commended for going the extra mile and testing it. If nothing else, it is valuable experience should a restore need to be done for real.
    I appreciate it and actually it's easier for me at the moment to fully test for real, as I already have the extra internal HDD mounted inside my PC (just disconnected) ... as opposed to installing/learning additional software to enable VM capability.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 24,461
    10 Home x64 (21H2) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #13

    grusmarco said:
    Thanks for the tip! I've got options to consider. One thing about a VM is that I feel as though it's a simulation of what would happen and still not really the same as doing it for real ... the next best thing probably.

    For testing a Macrium restore the best test is the one you propose to do, on the actual hardware you'd need to use should the HDD fail on you.


    As for VM's in general, they are as real as any other machine. Only the hardware is different, virtual as opposed to physical, so the drivers in use will be different.

    Each VM has its own unique hardware ID, independent of the machine it's running on. This means that a VM requires its own separate activation, with its ID stored on the activation servers along with a digital license for the edition it was activated for.

    When done playing with a VM that you have activated, don't just delete it - not unless you have a bottomless supply of keys to use. Before deleting, export the VM so that you can import it later and re-use its digital license. Like any other machine the hard drive is not part of the hardware ID so you can remove it before exporting to make the export smaller and give it a new drive when you import it.
      My Computers


  4. Posts : 7,084
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit
       #14

    cereberus said:
    Another good way is to restore image in a virtual hard drive.
    A good tip I never thought of!
      My Computers


  5. Posts : 13,536
    Windows10
       #15

    Steve C said:
    A good tip I never thought of!
    This is a really great way to do it as it is essentially like cloning. Only minor thing you need to do is add a boot entry for the vhd.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 1,020
    Windows 10 Pro 20H2 19042.572
       #16

    Bree said:

    But @grusmarco should be commended for going the extra mile and testing it. If nothing else, it is valuable experience should a restore need to be done for real.
    I to commend the OP for going the extra mile. I even test Macrium when a new release comes out. Not that they have ever failed, but being an old retired software developer, bug fixes, minor enhancements present little issue when in comes to the base function of a comericial software product. However when a major release are presented, knowing that every function even the base may change, then I will always re-test its base function.

      My Computers


  7. Posts : 22
    Windows 10 Pro 20H2 19042.804
    Thread Starter
       #17

    cereberus said:
    This is a really great way to do it as it is essentially like cloning. Only minor thing you need to do is add a boot entry for the vhd.
    This is an interesting option for me, because it doesn't require a virtual machine. Machine is still the same, just virtualizing the disk. Does it matter if it's a VHD or VHDX? If my MR image restore is 700 GB, do I need that much physical disk free for the VHD?

    BTW, I still plan to do the test using my extra internal HDD.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 13,536
    Windows10
       #18

    grusmarco said:
    This is an interesting option for me, because it doesn't require a virtual machine. Machine is still the same, just virtualizing the disk. Does it matter if it's a VHD or VHDX? If my MR image restore is 700 GB, do I need that much physical disk free for the VHD?

    BTW, I still plan to do the test using my extra internal HDD.
    I use VHDX files as a preference, type expandable.

    Re. 700 GB, it depends how you backed it up i.e. is there spare space on the partitions backed up. You can restore an image to a smaller drive to an extent - obviously vhd needs to be big enough to handle contents of image. In general, assume VHD needs to be as big as original drives backed up.

    If you had only had an 700 GB drive, and it only contained 200 GB data, you could create a 200 GB (plus some working margin eg 50 GB) Vhd(X) file.

    If the sole 700 GB drive had 400 GB data, there is not enough space to create a VHD big enough.



    A common two drive config is to have SSD as main drive with larger data drive

    I always backup C drive on my OS drive but create VHDX on larger SSD data drive (which has plenty of capacity).

    Of course if main drive is SSD but Vhd is on HDD, you will lose the benefit of an SSD but remember point here is to check restoring works fine.

    If you post an image from Reflect of the backup we can advise further.
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 22
    Windows 10 Pro 20H2 19042.804
    Thread Starter
       #19

    cereberus said:
    If you post an image from Reflect of the backup we can advise further.
    This is for a desktop PC with 2 TB HDD, system and data all on C: partition. Looks like it's using closer to 600 GB. So, my C: partition has enough space available to duplicate say 700 GB for VHDX and have roughly 500 GB remaining. I guess I was confirming that a "virtual" drive actually required the physical space for "real". 😊 I don't have any SSDs. My three external USB HDDs are 2 TB, 4 TB, 4 TB, which I'm using mostly for backup. And of course I have the extra internal HDD, which would also be large enough, but I don't recall the exact size off hand.

    Here's a screen capture from Reflect of backup image you requested:
    testing Macrium Reflect image restore completely-screenshot-10_8_2019-5_13_15-pm.png
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 13,536
    Windows10
       #20

    grusmarco said:
    This is for a desktop PC with 2 TB HDD, system and data all on C: partition. Looks like it's using closer to 600 GB. So, my C: partition has enough space available to duplicate say 700 GB for VHDX and have roughly 500 GB remaining. I guess I was confirming that a "virtual" drive actually required the physical space for "real".  I don't have any SSDs. My three external USB HDDs are 2 TB, 4 TB, 4 TB, which I'm using mostly for backup. And of course I have the extra internal HDD, which would also be large enough, but I don't recall the exact size off hand.

    Here's a screen capture from Reflect of backup image you requested:
    testing Macrium Reflect image restore completely-screenshot-10_8_2019-5_13_15-pm.png
    You could create a 700 GB VHDX and that would be big enough. For the vhd to test it, I would not bother with last two partitions as they are not really needed. You could get away with a 600 GB VHDX file but best if you store it in a different partition to C drive.

    You have space to reduce C drive partition by over 1 TB and create a new partition to hold Vhd file. Shrink by say 750 GB.

    As an aside, it is possible to use a VHD file on a second internal or even external drive as well.

    Probably best to use second internal drive really to avoid having to partition primary drive.
      My Computer


 

  Related Discussions
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:06.
Find Us




Windows 10 Forums