Most anti-virus/anti-malware method of browsing

  1. cytherian's Avatar
    Posts : 327
    Windows 10 v. 20H2, Build 19042.867
       #1

    Most anti-virus/anti-malware method of browsing


    It seems that so many anti-virus products are decent and do a fair job of protecting your computer, whether or not you pay for them. And all reviews I've read over the years usually conclude that free is best, because the "extra stuff" you get really don't help all that much unless you are prone to catching viruses.

    So... it all comes down to risky on-line behavior.

    That provokes this question: What's the safest & secure way to browse the Internet, without catching a virus? The idea being, that when you go "off the beaten path" to a site you don't normally view, is there a "sandbox" way to browse the site such that you will be able to:
    • Get a warning if the site is unsafe, or seems like it is trying to run malware
    • Be completely protected -- meaning, scripts and such can't run and the site is totally unable to do anything


    Any advice on how that can be done? I'm sure there are techniques out there, but before I start investing time to research, maybe someone here has already done it and can share. Thanks!
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  2. dalchina's Avatar
    Posts : 30,443
    Win 10 Pro (1903)
       #2

    Hi, some quick thoughts:
    Sandboxie - will sandbox your browser. Have a look.
    Avast (free) - now comes with its own sandboxed browser Avast safezone

    Extensions like WOT indicate site status, and Avast (free) gives a clear go-no-go indication (green ticks)
    Most anti-virus/anti-malware method of browsing-snap-2016-09-21-23.22.36.jpg

    Firefox has an extension that will block scripts completely.
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  3. Kol12's Avatar
    Posts : 2,807
    Windows 10 Pro ver 20H2
       #3

    Does Sandboxie interfere with other AV products?
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  4. dalchina's Avatar
    Posts : 30,443
    Win 10 Pro (1903)
       #4

    Suggest you see their FAQs e.g.
    Sandboxie - Known Conflicts
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  5. TairikuOkami's Avatar
    Posts : 4,770
    Windows Home Dev 21xxx x64
       #5

    cytherian said:
    That provokes this question: What's the safest & secure way to browse the Internet, without catching a virus? The idea being, that when you go "off the beaten path" to a site you don't normally view, is there a "sandbox" way to browse the site such that you will be able to:

    • Get a warning if the site is unsafe, or seems like it is trying to run malware
    • Be completely protected -- meaning, scripts and such can't run and the site is totally unable to do anything
    All major browsers are sandboxed these days, but additional sandbox will help, if browser's sandbox fails.
    As you pointed out, scripts are the main problems, so using something to disable them, really helps, like:

    NoScript for Firefox / ScriptSafe - Chrome Web Store / NotScripts extension - Opera add-ons

    You should also disable running scripts locally by disabling WSH, it prevents scripts used by 99% of malware.

    Microsoft - Disabling Windows Script Host

    Additionally removing powershell (ON by default) prevents the new malware, especially ransomware.

    https://securelist.com/blog/research/72417/the-rise-of-net-and-powershell-malware

    Using a safer DNS also helps enormously, it blocks an access to known malicious webpages, even hidden requests.

    Top 10 Best Public DNS Servers & Fastest DNS Servers 2016

    And then there are ADs. That is a sensitive subject here, but it has to be mentioned, since malvertising is becoming a serious issue, even Microsoft webpages were used to spread malware this year and not just any malware, ransomware.

    Big-name sites hit by rash of malicious ads spreading crypto ransomware [Updated] | Ars Technica

    Malvertising Campaign Using RIG EK Detected Pushing CrypMIC Ransomware

    For the record, I do not run AV nor a firewall and I am not afraid visiting any webpage with my setup. :)
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  6. dalchina's Avatar
    Posts : 30,443
    Win 10 Pro (1903)
       #6

    Ransomware:
    Bitdefender offers a free Anti-Ransomware program, and then there's
    CryptoPrevent Malware Prevention Foolish IT

    Note that using disk imaging routinely can be regarded as an anti-ransomware tactic, as it means you can restore your PC to a working state even if your disks/files/ folders have been encrypted.
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  7. TairikuOkami's Avatar
    Posts : 4,770
    Windows Home Dev 21xxx x64
       #7

    Indeed, RollBack Home Edition Free is good for restoring and for backing purposes as well.

    dalchina said:
    Bitdefender offers a free Anti-Ransomware program, and then there's
    CryptoPrevent Malware Prevention Foolish IT

    Unfortunately those are not bulletproof, just like AVs.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/cruelsister1/videos
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  8. dalchina's Avatar
    Posts : 30,443
    Win 10 Pro (1903)
       #8

    - which is why I also mentioned disk imaging.

    One thing you learn- financial scammers beat the authorities 95% of the time. Where there's a will... for example, apparently the USA's best anti-hacking cyber tools are on sale...
      My Computers


 

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