Making W10 Safe

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  1. Posts : 10
    DOS
       #1

    Making W10 Safe


    Newbie here currently using Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. Used W10 a while back but abandoned it. Here is why.
    I was trying to use my Amazon account and had trouble. Amazon found someone other than me tried to use my account. I had been hacked. After the tech at Amazon finished his work, there were 22 hackers on my account. I dumped W10 immediately.

    Now what I need is to be able to run Sketchup on W10 SAFELY. I followed a few sites on how to make W10 safe but obviously they did not work. Can someone point me toward ways to run W10 SAFELY?
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  2. Posts : 720
    Win10 x64 Pro - 2 desktops, 2 laptops
       #2

    I don't understand what Win10 has to do with your Amazon account being hacked.
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  3. Posts : 13,301
    Windows 10 Pro (x64) 21H2 19044.1526
       #3

    Windows 10 is relatively as safe as Linux.
    NO system is 100% safe .

    Basically you should put standards on your
    behavior .
    Change your passwords on a regular schedule.
    Avoid troublesome sites.
    Only open email from known sources.
    Run Adware and antiviral programs regularly .
    Not just when you suspect something.
    Keep a safe image of your system on a
    outside drive.

    Places like Amazon, Facebook, etc can be hacked
    but that's not Microsoft's fault or yours.
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  4. Posts : 8,684
    Mac OS Catalina
       #4

    Windows 10 has zero to do with what some schmuck stated at a Work @Home job for Amazon. Highly doubtful that 22 people were using your Amazon account. If they were, your bank would have advised you way before you even knew.


    Only about 100 Seller accounts got hacked in 2018. If a user account gets taken over, someone shared that information to allow someone nefarious into your account and not on Windows.
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  5. Posts : 4,546
    Windows 11 Pro 64-bit
       #5

    Sometimes, like when you’re shopping online, you have to protect the data that you’re sending over the Internet. To safely send that data, you need to use a secure connection. In a secure connection, your data is encrypted while it travels over the Internet. Thus, credit card numbers, account numbers, and other sensitive data are encoded so that they can’t be read by anyone except the website to which you’re sending them. What ou may even have guessed that the encrypted data is decrypted as it arrives so that your browser can display it. What you probably didn’t guess is some decrypted data is saved in your temporary Internet files. That means that if you download malware to the machine that you using for online banking, that malware could potentially access your bank account details by scanning the temporary files. This is also one of several reasons why you should be very wary of accessing secure financial sites from public computers at Internet cafes.

    To remove the risk of having confidential data lying around in your temporary files, you’ll want to instruct Internet Explorer not to save encrypted pages. To do so, click Tools > Internet Options > Advanced. The list of options is pretty long, so you’ll need to scroll down to the Security section to check the box next to Do not save encrypted pages to disk.



    To your changes you made click Apply and OK buttons.




    How You Can Tell If a Website is Secure

    Only ever put your card details into secure websites. Be on the look-out for the following signs to know you are shopping safely. Remember, this only means the site is secure, not that the seller is honest.

    Padlock symbol – There should be a padlock in the address bar next to the website address.

    Website address – This should start with https://. The S stands for secure

    Green address bar – On certain browsers and websites the address bar will turn green.

    Valid certificate – If you click the padlock symbol or just to the left of the address bar, you should see information on the site certificate. This should tell you who has registered the site. If you get a warning about a certificate, avoid the website.





    Use a Good Security Solution

    Invest in a security suite that offers anti-virus, a two-way firewall, and other essential tools, to protect your data and your computer from online threats.


    These are some really simple ways to shop safely online you can use every day:

    • Research retailers online to make sure they’re legitimate.
    • Make sure the website is secure.
    • Know your rights and the company’s returns policy.
    • Keep software and virus protection up-to-date and use strong passwords for online accounts.
    • Pay using a credit card. You will have more protection. Alternatively, online services like PayPal mean scammers will not be able to get hold of your bank details.
    • Be smart. If a deal looks too good to be true, it probably is.



    You should also be aware of pharming scams, where fraudsters attack the website you are trying to use.

    It will appear as if you’ve gone to the correct website, but it’s a fake version designed to steal your information. Be on the lookout for strange looking web addresses with a selection of numbers or a different spelling.


    Shopping online should be secure and enjoyable, and with these cyber security tips you can stay safe while you shop.



    Use Strong Passwords

    Passwords can be the first and sometimes best line of defense against cybercriminals. Using complex passwords is a good start, but they also need to be kept private and changed on a regular basis. Also, use a unique password for every website.
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  6. Posts : 17,347
    Windows 11 Pro
       #6

    dlw45 said:
    Now what I need is to be able to run Sketchup on W10 SAFELY. I followed a few sites on how to make W10 safe but obviously they did not work. Can someone point me toward ways to run W10 SAFELY?
    Well, I would say do the same thing that hundreds of millions of other users are doing to run Windows 10 safely. Keep it updated (and that certainly is no effort) and be careful what you click on.
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  7. Posts : 56,100
    Multi-boot Windows 10/11 - RTM, RP, Beta, and Insider
       #7

    pokeefe0001 said:
    I don't understand what Win10 has to do with your Amazon account being hacked.
    Nor do I. Nor do I see what Internet Explorer (as posted above) has to do with anything here. Just follow common sense, don't give your password to anybody for any reason, keep W10 updated with all security patches, and look before you click. Look.

    Windows 10 did not cause your Amazon account to get roached.
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  8. Posts : 79
    Windows 10 Pro
       #8

    Let me add that 99% of the time, it's the user who is responsible for being hacked (at his computer) and not the OS. You need to implement good behavior as stated above. Windows within the last few years has added lots of mitigations. It's safe. It's up to you to keep yourself safe, no matter what OS you are using; OpenBSD, FreeBSD, a Linux Variant, MacOS (Unix), or anything else.

    You should adapt to the mentality that your cyber security falls on your shoulders, and you will be a lot better off.
    Last edited by windoc; 27 Oct 2019 at 06:08.
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  9. Posts : 56,100
    Multi-boot Windows 10/11 - RTM, RP, Beta, and Insider
       #9

    windoc said:
    Let me add that 99% of the time, it's the user who is responsible for being hacked (at his computer) and not the OS. You need to implement good behavior as stated above. Windows within the last few years has added lots of mitigations. It's safe. It's up to you to keep yourself safe, no matter what OS you are using; OpenBSD, FreeBSD, a Linux Variant, MacOS (Unix), or anything else.

    You should adapt to the mentally that your cyber security falls on your shoulders, and you will be a lot better off.
    Well said.

    To borrow 2 terms from the military (and elsewhere), there's OPSEC and PERSEC. Operations Security and Personal Security. Practice both.
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  10. Posts : 1,652
    Windows 10 Pro x64
       #10

    dlw45 said:
    Can someone point me toward ways to run W10 SAFELY?
    I think the more likely scenario is that someone was able to guess your password, and you weren't using two-factor authentication to verify login to your account.

    You should consider using a password manager to generate unique, high-entropy passwords, in combination with 2FA/MFA to authenticate login to your accounts.
      My Computers


 

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