Windows 10: EMERGENCY - Boot Loop After Win Update

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  1.    17 May 2018 #21

    Hey zbook,

    I don't think that will work cuz I get all 0s in those files. What do you suggest?

    .... EDIT .....
    But Brink gave me an idea. I can disconnect my ssd from the PC and hook it up to one of the computers in the public library.

    I can just transfer files from my ssd to the library's computer and then onto a flash drive. What do you think?
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  2. Posts : 20,730
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       17 May 2018 #22

    See post #9.

    In post #9 the folder sizes were sizable.

    Was there a typo?
    Has the drive deteriorated?


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	yahanna emergency 5 17 2018.PNG 
Views:	3 
Size:	1,021.9 KB 
ID:	189206


    Moving the drive to another computer is ideal.
    (To move a SSD you will likely need a caddy?)
    https://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&ke...l_407lxfr38m_e
    On the other computer you have multiple options:
    a) Copy the whole users folder or the individual user folders
    b) Copy only those files that you know are not already backed up if you have limited space.
    c) Make a brand new backup image using Macrium if Macrium can be installed on the computer
    d) Test the drive with HD Tune, HD Sentinel, Macrorit, etc.
    14 Free Hard Drive Testing Tools (Updated May 2018)
    (Health (SMART), Benchmark, Full error scan (or surface scan))
    e) You must be prepared for anything. For example if the drive displays RAW.


    These are some drive testing software that you can install on a flash drive so that they are available when you can test the drive:
    Download Macrorit Disk Scanner Portable 4.3.0
    Download Portable CrystalDiskInfo 7.6.0
    CrystalDiskInfo Portable | PortableApps.com - Portable software for USB, portable and cloud drives
    Last edited by zbook; 17 May 2018 at 23:03.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  3.    17 May 2018 #23

    Hi zbook,

    I can't explain those errors you pointed out.

    But Brink suggested I create and boot from a Peppermint Live USB to recover my files. I think its the best thing to do without going through all those steps that haven't recovered my drive - though I greatly appreciate the help.

    I think I'll go to the library and download that file to my USB flash drive. Then go home, boot up my PC with it and transfer my files to another flash drive. After that I'll restore from a Macrium backup then transfer those files to the PC.

    Let me know what you think.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  4. Posts : 20,730
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       18 May 2018 #24
    Last edited by zbook; 18 May 2018 at 00:31.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    19 May 2018 #25

    Hi zbook,

    Someone suggested to remove the latest update through the command prompt in the recovery environment. He suggested the following which doesn't make sense:

    "wusa /uninstall /kb:2744842 /quiet /forcestart"

    Is the kb in the command the latest update? Would this solve my issue? If so do I enter that command above exactly as it says?
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  6. Posts : 20,730
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       19 May 2018 #26

    What progress was made with Ubuntu? Peppermint?

    Earlier this year there were problems with Spectre and Meltdown.
    Some Microsoft Windows updates had caused inaccessible boot device or loss of function of USB ports.
    The method to uninstall the Windows updates used a dism command.
    If you know of a cause and effect related to a Windows update you can uninstall the Widows update using command prompt and the dism command.
    Were you able to establish a connection with a problematic Windows update?
    Or was that trial and error?

    This is a command that can be used to uninstall a Windows update:
    Find the package(s) that were just installed by date. Run the following command on the last installed package:
    example: dism.exe /image:e:\ /remove-package /packagename:Package_for_KB4014329~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~10.0.1.0
    Reboot.
    This is an example for kb4014329. So if you are able to identify a Windows update as the problem then you would start with the kb# and enter the additional information related to theis KB# and then reboot.

    There were some commands used earlier that I did not see the complete results.
    Please run these commands and post images of the results:

    Open command prompt > X:\Sources>
    type these commands:

    1) bootrec /fixmbr
    2) bootrec /fixboot
    3) bootrec /scanos
    4) bootrec /rebuildbcd

    (This searches for windows installations not included in the BCD and then asks if you would like to add to it)
    (It will display that it successfully scanned all installations and the identified installations will be 0 or 1 or more)
    If 0 it displays: Total identified windows installations: 0 The operation completed successfully.
    If 1 it displays: Total identified windows installations: 1 [1] D:\windows Add installation to boot list? Yes/No/All:
    If 2 it displays: Total identified windows installations: 2 [1] D:\windows Add installation to boot list? Yes/No/All:
    etc.
    Type A
    reboot
    Please post an image of the commands and results into the thread.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  7.    19 May 2018 #27

    zbook said: View Post
    What progress was made with Ubuntu? Peppermint?

    Were you able to establish a connection with a problematic Windows update?
    Or was that trial and error?

    This is a command that can be used to uninstall a Windows update:
    Find the package(s) that were just installed by date. Run the following command on the last installed package:
    example: dism.exe /image:e:\ /remove-package /packagename:Package_for_KB4014329~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~10.0.1.0
    Reboot.
    This is an example for kb4014329. So if you are able to identify a Windows update as the problem then you would start with the kb# and enter the additional information related to theis KB# and then reboot.

    Please run these commands and post images of the results:

    Open command prompt > X:\Sources>
    type these commands:

    1) bootrec /fixmbr
    2) bootrec /fixboot
    3) bootrec /scanos
    4) bootrec /rebuildbcd

    (This searches for windows installations not included in the BCD and then asks if you would like to add to it)
    (It will display that it successfully scanned all installations and the identified installations will be 0 or 1 or more)
    If 0 it displays: Total identified windows installations: 0 The operation completed successfully.
    If 1 it displays: Total identified windows installations: 1 [1] D:\windows Add installation to boot list? Yes/No/All:
    If 2 it displays: Total identified windows installations: 2 [1] D:\windows Add installation to boot list? Yes/No/All:
    etc.
    Type A
    reboot
    Please post an image of the commands and results into the thread.
    Hi zbook,

    I'll be doing the peppermint thing today.

    To answer your other question, and again as i said before, the bootloop is attributable to the latest update 2 days ago when I 1st complained about it.

    Regarding deleting the update, I know it was the update from 2 days ago. But I don't know the name. Before I run the command to delete it, how could I find out the name to be sure?

    As you asked, I ran the 4 commands. Take a look at the images I took of their result.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  8. Posts : 20,730
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       19 May 2018 #28

    These links have some additional troubleshooting options:

    The first is from Microsoft and is the method to uninstall Windows updates found to be problematic after Spectre and Meltdown:



    • Use the Command Prompt to uninstall the update:


    • At the recovery screen, select Troubleshoot, then Advanced Options, and then Command Prompt. You may be asked to enter a BitLocker Recovery Key or username/password.  If prompted for a username/password, you must enter a local administrator account.
    • In the Command Prompt window, type the command listed below for your version of Windows and press ENTER.

    For 32-bit versions of Windows:
    dism.exe /image:c:\ /remove-package /packagename:Package_for_RollupFix~31bf3856ad364e35~x86~~16299.248.1.17
    For 64-bit versions of Windows:
    dism.exe /image:c:\ /remove-package /packagename:Package_for_RollupFix~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~16299.248.1.17
    Note: If Windows is not stored on the C: drive, replace the C: in the above commands with the appropriate drive letter.

    • Close the Command Prompt and click Continue to exit the Recovery Environment.
    • Restart to enter Windows. Important: To ensure that your system has the latest security updates, reinstall updates as soon as possible. Select the Start button, and then go to Settings > Update & security > Windows Update, select Check for updates and install the latest updates.


    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...ry-13-2018-upd


    The second is from NeoSmart Knowledgebase and has:
    Attempt Two: Manually Repairing the Windows Bootloader

    Desperate times call for desperate measures.



    Attempt Three: Nuclear Holocaust

    Back at the main page of the recovery center, go ahead and select “Command Prompt” yet again from that list.
    The first order of business is to make sure the MBR and bootsector contain the right references to the Windows bootloader:

    Fixing the Windows Bootloader via the setup DVD
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  9.    19 May 2018 #29

    Zbook,

    When I enter the command I get these errors in the image I attached. Take a look and let me know. I used various ways of entering the command.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  10.    19 May 2018 #30

    Xbook,

    I think I entered the commamd correctly this time. But I get an error saying:
    "can't access the image. Make sure the image path and windows directory for the image exist and you have read permissions on the folder."


    Maybe the drive is stored on a different drive? But its always been stored on the c: drive. According to the pics I sent, it could be stored in the e: drive but I'm not sure. Do you think its stored on the e: drive?
    Last edited by yahanna; 19 May 2018 at 21:56.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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